Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients

Sridevi V. Sarma, Uri T. Eden, Ming L. Cheng, Ziv Williams, Emad N. Eskandar, Emery N. Brown

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deep brain stimulation is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) that has enabled microelectrode recordings from single-unit cells in the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. This rare data is important to develop detailed characterizations of spiking activity to understand the pathophysiology of PD. Despite the point process nature of neuronal spiking activity, point process (PP) methods are not used to analyze these recordings. Therefore, we develop PP models using the generalized linear method to characterize spiking activity in 28 STN neurons in 7 PD patients executing a two-step motor task. In the first step of the task, patients could anticipate visual go cues and moved once prompted. In the second step of the task, go cues had a 50% chance of appearing. If cues failed to appear, movements were self-initiated. The point process models provide an accurate summary of pathological characteristics under different cued conditions such as bursting, 10-30Hz oscillations, and fluctuations in directional tuning. In particular, the models show that when cues can be anticipated or when patients self-initiate movements (in both cases an internal motor plan is formed prior to movement), pathological neural characteristics are suppressed. In contrast, when cues cannot be anticipated and later appear, there is no suppression of pathological neural characteristics. Consequently, movements deteriorate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009
Pages7716-7722
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009 - Shanghai, China
Duration: Dec 15 2009Dec 18 2009

Other

Other48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009
CountryChina
CityShanghai
Period12/15/0912/18/09

Fingerprint

Point Process
Parkinson's Disease
Process Model
Nucleus
Stepping motors
Microelectrodes
Pathophysiology
Neurons
Bursting
Brain
Tuning
Therapy
Neuron
Oscillation
Fluctuations
Internal
Unit
Vision
Movement
Cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Control and Optimization

Cite this

Sarma, S. V., Eden, U. T., Cheng, M. L., Williams, Z., Eskandar, E. N., & Brown, E. N. (2009). Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients. In Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009 (pp. 7716-7722). [5399938] https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938

Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients. / Sarma, Sridevi V.; Eden, Uri T.; Cheng, Ming L.; Williams, Ziv; Eskandar, Emad N.; Brown, Emery N.

Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009. 2009. p. 7716-7722 5399938.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sarma, SV, Eden, UT, Cheng, ML, Williams, Z, Eskandar, EN & Brown, EN 2009, Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients. in Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009., 5399938, pp. 7716-7722, 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009, Shanghai, China, 12/15/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938
Sarma SV, Eden UT, Cheng ML, Williams Z, Eskandar EN, Brown EN. Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients. In Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009. 2009. p. 7716-7722. 5399938 https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938
Sarma, Sridevi V. ; Eden, Uri T. ; Cheng, Ming L. ; Williams, Ziv ; Eskandar, Emad N. ; Brown, Emery N. / Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients. Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009. 2009. pp. 7716-7722
@inproceedings{6bf9624681844dd6b9f5bbd0f45358da,
title = "Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients",
abstract = "Deep brain stimulation is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) that has enabled microelectrode recordings from single-unit cells in the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. This rare data is important to develop detailed characterizations of spiking activity to understand the pathophysiology of PD. Despite the point process nature of neuronal spiking activity, point process (PP) methods are not used to analyze these recordings. Therefore, we develop PP models using the generalized linear method to characterize spiking activity in 28 STN neurons in 7 PD patients executing a two-step motor task. In the first step of the task, patients could anticipate visual go cues and moved once prompted. In the second step of the task, go cues had a 50{\%} chance of appearing. If cues failed to appear, movements were self-initiated. The point process models provide an accurate summary of pathological characteristics under different cued conditions such as bursting, 10-30Hz oscillations, and fluctuations in directional tuning. In particular, the models show that when cues can be anticipated or when patients self-initiate movements (in both cases an internal motor plan is formed prior to movement), pathological neural characteristics are suppressed. In contrast, when cues cannot be anticipated and later appear, there is no suppression of pathological neural characteristics. Consequently, movements deteriorate.",
author = "Sarma, {Sridevi V.} and Eden, {Uri T.} and Cheng, {Ming L.} and Ziv Williams and Eskandar, {Emad N.} and Brown, {Emery N.}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781424438716",
pages = "7716--7722",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Using point process models to determine the impact of visual cues on basal ganglia activity and behavior of Parkinson's patients

AU - Sarma, Sridevi V.

AU - Eden, Uri T.

AU - Cheng, Ming L.

AU - Williams, Ziv

AU - Eskandar, Emad N.

AU - Brown, Emery N.

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Deep brain stimulation is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) that has enabled microelectrode recordings from single-unit cells in the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. This rare data is important to develop detailed characterizations of spiking activity to understand the pathophysiology of PD. Despite the point process nature of neuronal spiking activity, point process (PP) methods are not used to analyze these recordings. Therefore, we develop PP models using the generalized linear method to characterize spiking activity in 28 STN neurons in 7 PD patients executing a two-step motor task. In the first step of the task, patients could anticipate visual go cues and moved once prompted. In the second step of the task, go cues had a 50% chance of appearing. If cues failed to appear, movements were self-initiated. The point process models provide an accurate summary of pathological characteristics under different cued conditions such as bursting, 10-30Hz oscillations, and fluctuations in directional tuning. In particular, the models show that when cues can be anticipated or when patients self-initiate movements (in both cases an internal motor plan is formed prior to movement), pathological neural characteristics are suppressed. In contrast, when cues cannot be anticipated and later appear, there is no suppression of pathological neural characteristics. Consequently, movements deteriorate.

AB - Deep brain stimulation is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) that has enabled microelectrode recordings from single-unit cells in the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. This rare data is important to develop detailed characterizations of spiking activity to understand the pathophysiology of PD. Despite the point process nature of neuronal spiking activity, point process (PP) methods are not used to analyze these recordings. Therefore, we develop PP models using the generalized linear method to characterize spiking activity in 28 STN neurons in 7 PD patients executing a two-step motor task. In the first step of the task, patients could anticipate visual go cues and moved once prompted. In the second step of the task, go cues had a 50% chance of appearing. If cues failed to appear, movements were self-initiated. The point process models provide an accurate summary of pathological characteristics under different cued conditions such as bursting, 10-30Hz oscillations, and fluctuations in directional tuning. In particular, the models show that when cues can be anticipated or when patients self-initiate movements (in both cases an internal motor plan is formed prior to movement), pathological neural characteristics are suppressed. In contrast, when cues cannot be anticipated and later appear, there is no suppression of pathological neural characteristics. Consequently, movements deteriorate.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77950819938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77950819938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938

DO - 10.1109/CDC.2009.5399938

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781424438716

SP - 7716

EP - 7722

BT - Proceedings of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control held jointly with 2009 28th Chinese Control Conference, CDC/CCC 2009

ER -