Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents: "Proof-of-Concept" Study

Jonathan Nakhla, Andrew Kobets, Rafeal De la Garza Ramos, Neil Haranhalli, Yaroslav Gelfand, Adam Ammar, Murray Echt, Aleka Scoco, Merritt D. Kinon, Reza Yassari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The relatively decreased time spent in the operating room and overall reduction in cases performed by neurosurgical trainees as a result of duty-hour restrictions demands that the pedagogical content within each surgical encounter be maximized and crafted toward the specific talents and shortcomings of the individual. It is imperative to future generations that the quality of training adapts to the changing administrative infrastructures and compensates for anything that may compromise the technical abilities of trainees. Neurosurgeons in teaching hospitals continue to experiment with various emerging technologies-such as simulators and virtual presence-to supplement and improve surgical training. Methods: The authors participated in the Google Glass Explorer Program in order to assess the applicability of Google Glass as a tool to enhance the operative education of neurosurgical residents. Google Glass is a type of wearable technology in the form of eyeglasses that employs a high-definition camera and allows the user to interact using voice commands. Results: Google Glass was able to effectively capture video segments of various lengths for residents to review in a variety of clinical settings within a large, tertiary care university hospital, as well as during a surgical mission to a developing country. The resolution and quality of the video were adequate to review and use as a teaching tool. Conclusion: While Google Glass harbors the potential to dramatically improve both neurosurgical education and practice in a variety of ways, certain technical drawbacks of the current model limit its effectiveness as a teaching tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 19 2016

Fingerprint

Neurosurgery
Glass
Education
Aptitude
Teaching
Technology
Social Responsibility
Tertiary Healthcare
Operating Rooms
Teaching Hospitals
Developing Countries

Keywords

  • Google Glass
  • Neurosurgical training
  • Resident education
  • Surgical training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents : "Proof-of-Concept" Study. / Nakhla, Jonathan; Kobets, Andrew; De la Garza Ramos, Rafeal; Haranhalli, Neil; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Ammar, Adam; Echt, Murray; Scoco, Aleka; Kinon, Merritt D.; Yassari, Reza.

In: World Neurosurgery, 19.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakhla, Jonathan ; Kobets, Andrew ; De la Garza Ramos, Rafeal ; Haranhalli, Neil ; Gelfand, Yaroslav ; Ammar, Adam ; Echt, Murray ; Scoco, Aleka ; Kinon, Merritt D. ; Yassari, Reza. / Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents : "Proof-of-Concept" Study. In: World Neurosurgery. 2016.
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