Use of active-play video games to enhance aerobic fitness in schizophrenia

Feasibility, safety, and adherence

David Kimhy, Samira Khan, Lindsey Ayanrouh, Rachel W. Chang, Marie C. Hansen, Amanda Lister, Jacob S. Ballon, Julia Vakhrusheva, Hilary F. Armstrong, Matthew N. Bartels, Richard P. Sloan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Active-play video games have been used to enhance aerobic fitness in various clinical populations, but their use among individuals with schizophrenia has been limited. Methods: Feasibility, acceptability, safety, and adherence data were obtained for use of aerobic exercise (AE) equipment by 16 individuals with schizophrenia during a 12-week AE program consisting of three one-hour exercise sessions per week. Equipment included exercise video games for Xbox 360 with Kinect motion sensing devices and traditional exercise equipment. Results: Most participants (81%) completed the training, attending an average of 79% of sessions. The proportion of time spent playing Xbox (39%) exceeded time spent on any other type of equipment. When using Xbox, participants played 2.2461.59 games per session and reported high acceptability and enjoyment ratings, with no adverse events. Conclusions: Measures of feasibility, acceptability, adherence, and safety support the integration of active-play video games into AE training for people with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-243
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Video Games
Schizophrenia
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Exercise
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kimhy, D., Khan, S., Ayanrouh, L., Chang, R. W., Hansen, M. C., Lister, A., ... Sloan, R. P. (2016). Use of active-play video games to enhance aerobic fitness in schizophrenia: Feasibility, safety, and adherence. Psychiatric Services, 67(2), 240-243. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201400523

Use of active-play video games to enhance aerobic fitness in schizophrenia : Feasibility, safety, and adherence. / Kimhy, David; Khan, Samira; Ayanrouh, Lindsey; Chang, Rachel W.; Hansen, Marie C.; Lister, Amanda; Ballon, Jacob S.; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Armstrong, Hilary F.; Bartels, Matthew N.; Sloan, Richard P.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 67, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 240-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kimhy, D, Khan, S, Ayanrouh, L, Chang, RW, Hansen, MC, Lister, A, Ballon, JS, Vakhrusheva, J, Armstrong, HF, Bartels, MN & Sloan, RP 2016, 'Use of active-play video games to enhance aerobic fitness in schizophrenia: Feasibility, safety, and adherence', Psychiatric Services, vol. 67, no. 2, pp. 240-243. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201400523
Kimhy, David ; Khan, Samira ; Ayanrouh, Lindsey ; Chang, Rachel W. ; Hansen, Marie C. ; Lister, Amanda ; Ballon, Jacob S. ; Vakhrusheva, Julia ; Armstrong, Hilary F. ; Bartels, Matthew N. ; Sloan, Richard P. / Use of active-play video games to enhance aerobic fitness in schizophrenia : Feasibility, safety, and adherence. In: Psychiatric Services. 2016 ; Vol. 67, No. 2. pp. 240-243.
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