Use of a reconstituted basement membrane to measure cell invasiveness and select for highly invasive tumor cells

V. P. Terranova, E. S. Hujanen, D. M. Loeb, G. R. Martin, L. Thornburg, V. Glushko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

170 Scopus citations

Abstract

Malignant cells must traverse basement membranes during their migration to sites distant from the primary tumor. Since basement membranes are thought to be a critical barrier to the passage of tumor cells, we have constructed a model basement membrane-stromal matrix consisting of laminin and type IV collagen reconstituted onto a disk of type I collagen for use in an in vitro assay of invasiveness. Metastatic tumor cells and leukocytes are able to cross this barrier, whereas nonmetastatic tumor cells, fibroblasts, and epidermal cells cannot penetrate it. These tumor cells that penetrate the barriers were found, when isolated and subcultured, to be more invasive and to produce more metastases than the parental population. This assay system should be useful for studying the invasiveness of tumor cells and for isolating highly invasive variants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-469
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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