Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity during outpatient preventive care visits

Anisha I. Patel, Kristine A. Madsen, Judith H. Maselli, Michael D. Cabana, Randall S. Stafford, Adam L. Hersh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine obesity diagnosis, obesity-related counseling, and laboratory testing rates among obese pediatric patients seen in US preventive outpatient visits and to determine patient, provider, and practice-level factors that are associated with obesity diagnosis. Methods: By using 2005-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data, outpatient preventive visits made by obese (body mass index ≥95%) 2- to 18-year-old patients were examined for frequencies of obesity diagnosis, diet, exercise, or weight reduction counseling, and glucose or cholesterol testing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine whether patient-level (gender, age, race/ethnicity, insurance type) and provider/practice-level (geographic region, provider specialty, and practice setting) factors were associated with physician obesity diagnosis. Results: Physicians documented an obesity diagnosis in 18% (95% confidence interval, 13-23) of visits made by 2- to 18-year-old patients with a body mass index ≥95%. Documentation of an obesity diagnosis was more likely for non-white patients (odds ratio 2.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.3). Physicians were more likely to provide obesity-related counseling (51% of visits) than to conduct laboratory testing (10% of visits) for obese pediatric patients. Conclusion: Rates of documented obesity diagnosis, obesity-related counseling, and laboratory testing for comorbid conditions among obese pediatric patients seen in US outpatient preventive visits are suboptimal. Efforts should target enhanced obesity diagnosis as a first step toward improving pediatric obesity management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-409
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
Pediatric Obesity
Ambulatory Care
Obesity
Counseling
Health Care Surveys
Outpatients
Pediatrics
Physicians
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
Insurance
Documentation
Weight Loss
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Cholesterol
Exercise
Diet

Keywords

  • Children
  • Diagnosis
  • Obesity
  • Screening
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Patel, A. I., Madsen, K. A., Maselli, J. H., Cabana, M. D., Stafford, R. S., & Hersh, A. L. (2010). Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity during outpatient preventive care visits. Academic Pediatrics, 10(6), 405-409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2010.09.004

Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity during outpatient preventive care visits. / Patel, Anisha I.; Madsen, Kristine A.; Maselli, Judith H.; Cabana, Michael D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Hersh, Adam L.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 10, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 405-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, AI, Madsen, KA, Maselli, JH, Cabana, MD, Stafford, RS & Hersh, AL 2010, 'Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity during outpatient preventive care visits', Academic Pediatrics, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 405-409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2010.09.004
Patel, Anisha I. ; Madsen, Kristine A. ; Maselli, Judith H. ; Cabana, Michael D. ; Stafford, Randall S. ; Hersh, Adam L. / Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity during outpatient preventive care visits. In: Academic Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 6. pp. 405-409.
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