Ultraviolet radiation and melanoma.

Holly E. Kanavy, Meg R. Gerstenblith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Melanoma is a particularly aggressive type of skin cancer, and its incidence has been increasing steadily since the 1970s. This article will review the extensive epidemiologic data demonstrating that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, from the sun or artificial tanning beds, is the most important environmental risk factor for melanoma; the multiple detrimental effects of UVR on human skin, including DNA damage through the formation of dimeric photoproducts, gene mutations, oxidative stress, inflammation, and immunosuppression, all of which contribute to melanomagenesis; and the evidence that protection from UVR exposure, whether by melanin or by sunscreen, reduces the risk of developing melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-228
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume30
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Melanoma
Radiation
Tanning
Sunscreening Agents
Melanins
Radiation Effects
Skin Neoplasms
Solar System
Immunosuppression
DNA Damage
Oxidative Stress
Inflammation
Skin
Mutation
Incidence
Genes
Radiation Exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Ultraviolet radiation and melanoma. / Kanavy, Holly E.; Gerstenblith, Meg R.

In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 30, No. 4, 12.2011, p. 222-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kanavy, HE & Gerstenblith, MR 2011, 'Ultraviolet radiation and melanoma.', Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 222-228.
Kanavy, Holly E. ; Gerstenblith, Meg R. / Ultraviolet radiation and melanoma. In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 222-228.
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