Ultrasound elastography in children

Establishing the normal range of muscle elasticity

Netanel S. Berko, Erin F. Fitzgerald, Terry D. Amaral, Monica Payares, Terry L. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ultrasound elastography allows assessment of tissue elasticity. To the best of our knowledge, the elastography appearance of muscles in normal children has not been described. Objective: To determine the US elasticity of muscles in children at rest and following exercise. Materials and methods: Cine elastography of biceps brachii and rectus femoris muscles was obtained at rest and after exercise in 42 healthy children (23 males, 19 females; mean: 11.2 ± 4.4 years, range: 2-18 years). Elastography scores were assigned to each clip based on a five-point color scale. Mean elastography scores and standard deviations were calculated and resting and postexercise elastography scores were compared. Results: Resting muscle elasticity was lower in the biceps brachii than in the rectus femoris (P = 0.008), and higher in the dominant than in the nondominant biceps brachii (P < 0.032). Rectus femoris elasticity was higher in males than females (P = 0.051). Postexercise muscle elasticity significantly increased in both the dominant and nondominant biceps brachii (P < 0.001) and in the rectus femoris (P < 0.001). There was no significant gender-related difference in postexercise muscle elasticity. Biceps brachii elasticity decreased and rectus femoris elasticity increased with increasing body mass index. Younger subjects had a greater change in muscle elasticity with exercise. Conclusion: Resting muscle elasticity in children is significantly lower in the biceps brachii than in the rectus femoris and in the nondominant biceps brachii than in the dominant biceps brachii. Elasticity significantly increases immediately postexercise in both muscle groups; resting differences between biceps brachii and rectus femoris elasticity, and dominant and nondominant biceps brachii elasticity, do not persist after exercise. The change in muscle elasticity with exercise is higher in younger children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Radiology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Elasticity Imaging Techniques
Elasticity
Reference Values
Muscles
Quadriceps Muscle
Exercise
Surgical Instruments

Keywords

  • Children
  • Elastography
  • Muscle
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Berko, N. S., Fitzgerald, E. F., Amaral, T. D., Payares, M., & Levin, T. L. (2014). Ultrasound elastography in children: Establishing the normal range of muscle elasticity. Pediatric Radiology, 44(2), 158-163. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-013-2793-z

Ultrasound elastography in children : Establishing the normal range of muscle elasticity. / Berko, Netanel S.; Fitzgerald, Erin F.; Amaral, Terry D.; Payares, Monica; Levin, Terry L.

In: Pediatric Radiology, Vol. 44, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 158-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berko, NS, Fitzgerald, EF, Amaral, TD, Payares, M & Levin, TL 2014, 'Ultrasound elastography in children: Establishing the normal range of muscle elasticity', Pediatric Radiology, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 158-163. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-013-2793-z
Berko, Netanel S. ; Fitzgerald, Erin F. ; Amaral, Terry D. ; Payares, Monica ; Levin, Terry L. / Ultrasound elastography in children : Establishing the normal range of muscle elasticity. In: Pediatric Radiology. 2014 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 158-163.
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