Turning anti-ageing genes against cancer

Valter D. Longo, Michael R. Lieber, Jan Vijg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies in diverse organisms implicate proto-oncogenic pathways, including insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), Ras and AKT/protein kinase B in the ageing process. Although IGF-I is thought to contribute to cancer by promoting growth and preventing apoptosis, evidence from model organisms suggests that proto-oncogene homologues might contribute to the DNA mutations and chromosomal damage that are observed in tumour cells by increasing DNA damage, in both dividing and non-dividing cells, and involving error-prone systems in DNA repair. This raises the possibility that cancer can be reduced by chronic downregulation of pro-ageing pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)903-910
Number of pages8
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Genes
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
ras Proteins
Neoplasms
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
Proto-Oncogenes
DNA Repair
DNA Damage
Down-Regulation
Apoptosis
Mutation
DNA
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Turning anti-ageing genes against cancer. / Longo, Valter D.; Lieber, Michael R.; Vijg, Jan.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 9, No. 11, 11.2008, p. 903-910.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Longo, Valter D. ; Lieber, Michael R. ; Vijg, Jan. / Turning anti-ageing genes against cancer. In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 9, No. 11. pp. 903-910.
@article{102ee0368dc642e4873a504d0c907caa,
title = "Turning anti-ageing genes against cancer",
abstract = "Recent studies in diverse organisms implicate proto-oncogenic pathways, including insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), Ras and AKT/protein kinase B in the ageing process. Although IGF-I is thought to contribute to cancer by promoting growth and preventing apoptosis, evidence from model organisms suggests that proto-oncogene homologues might contribute to the DNA mutations and chromosomal damage that are observed in tumour cells by increasing DNA damage, in both dividing and non-dividing cells, and involving error-prone systems in DNA repair. This raises the possibility that cancer can be reduced by chronic downregulation of pro-ageing pathways.",
author = "Longo, {Valter D.} and Lieber, {Michael R.} and Jan Vijg",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1038/nrm2526",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "903--910",
journal = "Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology",
issn = "1471-0072",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Turning anti-ageing genes against cancer

AU - Longo, Valter D.

AU - Lieber, Michael R.

AU - Vijg, Jan

PY - 2008/11

Y1 - 2008/11

N2 - Recent studies in diverse organisms implicate proto-oncogenic pathways, including insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), Ras and AKT/protein kinase B in the ageing process. Although IGF-I is thought to contribute to cancer by promoting growth and preventing apoptosis, evidence from model organisms suggests that proto-oncogene homologues might contribute to the DNA mutations and chromosomal damage that are observed in tumour cells by increasing DNA damage, in both dividing and non-dividing cells, and involving error-prone systems in DNA repair. This raises the possibility that cancer can be reduced by chronic downregulation of pro-ageing pathways.

AB - Recent studies in diverse organisms implicate proto-oncogenic pathways, including insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), Ras and AKT/protein kinase B in the ageing process. Although IGF-I is thought to contribute to cancer by promoting growth and preventing apoptosis, evidence from model organisms suggests that proto-oncogene homologues might contribute to the DNA mutations and chromosomal damage that are observed in tumour cells by increasing DNA damage, in both dividing and non-dividing cells, and involving error-prone systems in DNA repair. This raises the possibility that cancer can be reduced by chronic downregulation of pro-ageing pathways.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54549116989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54549116989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrm2526

DO - 10.1038/nrm2526

M3 - Article

C2 - 18946478

AN - SCOPUS:54549116989

VL - 9

SP - 903

EP - 910

JO - Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology

JF - Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology

SN - 1471-0072

IS - 11

ER -