Tunneled-cuffed catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus

Michele H. Mokrzycki, Bernd Schröppel, Gero Von Gersdorff, Heather Rush, Miroslaw P. Zdunek, Robert E. Feingold

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Abstract

Infection rates in tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCC) are reported to be higher in immunocompromised patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate TCC-associated infection rates in patients with HIV infection (HIV+). Data were collected in 40 HIV+ patients and 41 controls (C), and in 118 TCC (HIV+, 58; C, 60) for 28,146 catheter days (HIV+, 16,227; C, 11,919). There were no significant differences in the TCC bacteremia rates (HIV+, 2.23 versus C, 2.53 per 1000 TCC days, P = NS) or in the TCC exit site infection rates (HIV+, 2.20 versus C, 2.24 per 1000 TCC days, P = NS) between the groups. The number of TCC removed due to infection was also similar, (HIV+ versus C: 17 versus 15%, P = NS). In the HIV+ group, the association of hepatitis B surface antigenemia with TCC exit site infection was dependent on the history of injection drug use. Black race was a significant risk factor for higher TCC exit site infection rates, whereas prophylactic antibiotic use and high CD4 count were significantly associated with lower TCC exit site infection rates. None of the factors significantly predicted bacteremia rate in either group (HIV+ or C). In comparison to controls, HIV+ patients had a fivefold increased risk of having a Gram-negative organism (P = 0.02) and a sevenfold increased risk of a fungal isolate (P = 0.08), although the latter finding was not statistically significant. HIV infection is not a significant risk factor for TCC-associated infection but is associated with a higher prevalence of Gram-negative and fungal species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2122-2127
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume11
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000

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Catheter-Related Infections
Renal Dialysis
Catheters
HIV
HIV Infections
Infection
Bacteremia
Immunocompromised Host
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Hepatitis B
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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Tunneled-cuffed catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus. / Mokrzycki, Michele H.; Schröppel, Bernd; Von Gersdorff, Gero; Rush, Heather; Zdunek, Miroslaw P.; Feingold, Robert E.

In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 11, No. 11, 2000, p. 2122-2127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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