Tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis using a liquid isoniazid-methadone admixture for drug users in methadone maintenance

Patrick G. O'Connor, Julia M. Shi, Susan Henry, Amanda J. Durante, Lloyd Friedman, Peter A. Selwyn

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Tuberculosis is common in drug users, although compliance with therapy may be difficult in this population. Objective. To evaluate an approach to enhancing compliance with tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis in drug users enrolled on methadone maintenance utilizing an isoniazid (INH)-methadone admixture. Design. A prospective cohort study. Setting. A drug treatment program in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Patients. Opioid-dependent drug users enrolled in methadone maintenance. Intervention. Liquid isoniazid was mixed into subjects' daily dose of methadone. Vitamin B6 was given to subjects for self-administration. Measurements and main results. Number of eligible subjects, reasons for not starting therapy, number starting therapy, proportion completing therapy and median duration of INH therapy were calculated. Thirty-nine subjects were eligible for INH chemoprophylaxis: 34 (87%) received INH mixed directly in their methadone and five (13%) had their INH consumption supervised by a nurse. Among these subjects, 72% (28/39) completed therapy. Among the 11 subjects who discontinued INH, discharge from the methadone maintenance program was the most common reason - 73% (8/11). Thus, among the 31 subjects who were not discharged from methadone maintenance, 90% (28/31) successfully completed INH prophylaxis. The median duration of therapy was 182 days. Conclusions. Tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis using a liquid isoniazid-methadone admixture appear to be an effective approach to enhancing compliance with this therapy in methadone-maintained drug users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1071-1075
Number of pages5
JournalAddiction
Volume94
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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