Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel

Adelisa L. Panlilio, Dale R. Burwen, Amy B. Curtis, Pamela U. Srivastava, John Bernardo, Michela T. Catalano, Meryl H. Mendelson, Peter Nicholas, William Pagano, Carol Sulis, Ida M. Onorato, Mary E. Chamberland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To estimate the incidence of and assess risk factors for occupational Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission to health care personnel (HCP) in 5 New York City and Boston health care facilities, performance of prospective tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) was conducted from April 1994 through October 1995. Two-step testing was used at the enrollment of 2198 HCP with negative TST results. Follow-up visits were scheduled for every 6 months. Thirty (1.5%) of 1960 HCP with ≥1 follow-up evaluation had TST conversion (that is, an increase in TST induration of ≥10 mm). Independent risk factors for TST conversion were entering the United States after 1991 and inclusion in a tuberculosis-contact investigation in the workplace. These findings suggest that occupational transmission of M. tuberculosis occurred, as well as possible nonoccupational transmission or late boosting among foreign-born HCP who recently entered the United States. These results demonstrate the difficulty in interpreting TST results and estimating conversion rates among HCP, especially when large proportions of foreign-born HCP are included in surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

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Tuberculin
Tuberculin Test
Health Personnel
Skin Tests
Delivery of Health Care
Skin
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Health Facilities
Workplace
Tuberculosis
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Panlilio, A. L., Burwen, D. R., Curtis, A. B., Srivastava, P. U., Bernardo, J., Catalano, M. T., ... Chamberland, M. E. (2002). Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 35(3), 219-227. https://doi.org/10.1086/341303

Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel. / Panlilio, Adelisa L.; Burwen, Dale R.; Curtis, Amy B.; Srivastava, Pamela U.; Bernardo, John; Catalano, Michela T.; Mendelson, Meryl H.; Nicholas, Peter; Pagano, William; Sulis, Carol; Onorato, Ida M.; Chamberland, Mary E.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.08.2002, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panlilio, AL, Burwen, DR, Curtis, AB, Srivastava, PU, Bernardo, J, Catalano, MT, Mendelson, MH, Nicholas, P, Pagano, W, Sulis, C, Onorato, IM & Chamberland, ME 2002, 'Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 219-227. https://doi.org/10.1086/341303
Panlilio AL, Burwen DR, Curtis AB, Srivastava PU, Bernardo J, Catalano MT et al. Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2002 Aug 1;35(3):219-227. https://doi.org/10.1086/341303
Panlilio, Adelisa L. ; Burwen, Dale R. ; Curtis, Amy B. ; Srivastava, Pamela U. ; Bernardo, John ; Catalano, Michela T. ; Mendelson, Meryl H. ; Nicholas, Peter ; Pagano, William ; Sulis, Carol ; Onorato, Ida M. ; Chamberland, Mary E. / Tuberculin skin testing surveillance of health care personnel. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2002 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 219-227.
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