Tuberculin skin testing in children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1996, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended targeted tuberculin skin testing (TST) of children while discouraging routine TST of children without risk factors for tuberculosis (TB). Recent studies have provided evidence in support of the targeted TST and recommendations that favor risk assessment over universal screening with TST. While evidence for targeted TB testing exists and benefits of screening programs are clear, administrative logistics could be a greater issue. The challenge for public health and school officials is to develop a screening program that avoids stigmatization of the at-risk group. Until then, pediatric healthcare providers will continue to have a key role in identifying children at risk for latent TB infection by using the AAP-endorsed risk-assessment questionnaire and should screen children with TST only when >1 risk factor is present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-728
Number of pages4
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Tuberculin
Skin
Pediatrics
Tuberculosis
Public Health Schools
Latent Tuberculosis
Stereotyping
Health Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Tuberculin skin testing in children. / Reznik, Marina; Ozuah, Philip O.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 12, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 725-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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