Trapped immunoglobulins on peripheral nerve myelin from patients with diabetes mellitus

M. Brownlee, H. Vlassara, A. Cerami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is characterized by endoneurial capillary closure and by segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration in a spatial pattern consistent with ischemic damage. The increased permeability of human diabetic endoneurial capillaries to plasma proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of these structural changes in peripheral nerve by further accelerating the rate at which plasma proteins are trapped by reactive nonenzymatic glycosylation products on long-lived proteins such as myelin. We have measured trapped immunoglobins (Ig) G and M on peripheral nerve myelin from diabetic and nondiabetic patients by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine whether plasma proteins accumulate on nerves as they do in the glomerular matrix of diabetics. The amount of trapped IgG on brain myelin from these subjects was also determined. Peripheral nerve myelin from diabetics had on average > 14 times the amount of trapped IgM found in identically prepared samples from nondiabetics (0.90 ± 0.2 vs. 0.06 ± 0.004 OD/μg myelin protein) and > 4 times the amount of trapped IgG (6.40 ± 1.92 vs 1.5 ± 0.25 OD/μg myelin protein). In contrast, no significant trapping of IgG was detected in any samples of brain myelin. This most likely reflects effective exclusion of IgG by the blood-brain barrier. These data suggest that excessive trapping of Igs and other plasma proteins by diabetic peripheral nerve myelin may contribute to the development of peripheral nerve damage, whereas the lack of such trapping by brain myelin may partly explain the rarity of diabetic central neuropathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1003
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes
Volume35
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myelin Sheath
Peripheral Nerves
Immunoglobulins
Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Proteins
Immunoglobulin G
Myelin Proteins
Diabetic Neuropathies
Brain
Demyelinating Diseases
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Blood-Brain Barrier
Glycosylation
Immunoglobulin M
Permeability
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Brownlee, M., Vlassara, H., & Cerami, A. (1986). Trapped immunoglobulins on peripheral nerve myelin from patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes, 35(9), 999-1003.

Trapped immunoglobulins on peripheral nerve myelin from patients with diabetes mellitus. / Brownlee, M.; Vlassara, H.; Cerami, A.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 35, No. 9, 1986, p. 999-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brownlee, M, Vlassara, H & Cerami, A 1986, 'Trapped immunoglobulins on peripheral nerve myelin from patients with diabetes mellitus', Diabetes, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 999-1003.
Brownlee, M. ; Vlassara, H. ; Cerami, A. / Trapped immunoglobulins on peripheral nerve myelin from patients with diabetes mellitus. In: Diabetes. 1986 ; Vol. 35, No. 9. pp. 999-1003.
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