Transgenic mice expressing a hemopoietic growth factor gene (GM-CSF) develop accumulations of macrophages, blindness, and a fatal syndrome of tissue damage

R. A. Lang, D. Metcalf, R. A. Cuthbertson, I. Lyons, E. Stanley, A. Kelso, G. Kannourakis, D. J. Williamson, G. K. Klintworth, T. J. Gonda, A. R. Dunn

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31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transgenic mice carrying the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expressed from a retroviral promotor exhibit elevated levels of GM-CSF in the serum, urine, peritoneal cavity, and eye. The eyes of transgenic mice are opaque, contain accumulations of macrophages, and develop retinal damage. Similarly, lesions containing macrophages develop in striated muscle. The mice also display an accumulation of large, often multinucleate, activated macrophages in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. The transgene is transcribed in peritoneal cells, as well as in eyes and infiltrated striated muscle. A high proportion of transgenic mice die with muscle wasting when aged 2-4 months, possibly because of macrophage activation resulting from the high levels of GM-CSF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-686
Number of pages12
JournalCell
Volume53
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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    Lang, R. A., Metcalf, D., Cuthbertson, R. A., Lyons, I., Stanley, E., Kelso, A., Kannourakis, G., Williamson, D. J., Klintworth, G. K., Gonda, T. J., & Dunn, A. R. (1988). Transgenic mice expressing a hemopoietic growth factor gene (GM-CSF) develop accumulations of macrophages, blindness, and a fatal syndrome of tissue damage. Cell, 53(4), 675-686.