Transfer of experimental antiphospholipid syndrome by bone marrow cell transplantation: The importance of the T cell

M. Blank, I. Krause, N. Lanir, P. Vardi, B. Gilburd, A. Tincani, Yaron Tomer, Y. Shoenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate the potential of bone marrow cells from mice with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) to transfer the disease to naive mice, and to determine the importance of the role of T cells in the APS. Methods. Experimental primary APS was induced in naive mice following active immunization with anticardiolipin (aCL) monoclonal antibody (MAb). Whole- population or T cell-depleted bone marrow cells from mice with experimental primary APS were infused into total body-irradiated naive BALB/c recipients. Results. Bone marrow cells (in the presence of T cells) had the potential to induce experimental APS in naive mice, which resulted in high serum titers of aCL, antiphosphatidylserine, and antiphosphatidylinositol antibodies; an increased number of antibody-forming cells specific for each of the above phospholipids; a positive lymph node cell proliferative response to aCL MAb; and clinical features of primary APS, including thrombocytopenia, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (indicating the presence of lupus anticoagulant), and a high frequency of fetal resorptions (the equivalent of human fetal loss). T cell-depleted bone marrow cells did not transfer the disease. Conclusion. This study demonstrates the important role of T cells in the development and transfer of experimental primary APS and raises the possibility of T cell manipulations in treatments to prevent this condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Bone Marrow Transplantation
T-Lymphocytes
Bone Marrow Cells
Anticardiolipin Antibodies
Fetal Resorption
Monoclonal Antibodies
Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Antibodies
Thrombocytopenia
Phospholipids
Vaccination
Lymph Nodes
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Transfer of experimental antiphospholipid syndrome by bone marrow cell transplantation : The importance of the T cell. / Blank, M.; Krause, I.; Lanir, N.; Vardi, P.; Gilburd, B.; Tincani, A.; Tomer, Yaron; Shoenfeld, Y.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.1995, p. 115-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blank, M. ; Krause, I. ; Lanir, N. ; Vardi, P. ; Gilburd, B. ; Tincani, A. ; Tomer, Yaron ; Shoenfeld, Y. / Transfer of experimental antiphospholipid syndrome by bone marrow cell transplantation : The importance of the T cell. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 1995 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 115-122.
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