Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft

Nitya E. Abraham, Adrienne Quirouet, Howard B. Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: Extrusion and infection are potential postoperative complications when using synthetic mesh for abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Long-term follow-up in the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial revealed an estimated 9.9 % risk of mesh extrusion. There are 26 reports of spondylodiscitis after sacrocolpopexy with synthetic mesh. These surgical risks may be decreased by using autologous fascia. To date, there have been no reports of extrusion or spondylodiscitis after using autologous fascia for sacrocolpopexy. Methods: This video demonstrates transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with an autologous rectus fascia graft. A 76-year-old woman with symptomatic stage 3 prolapse also had a history of diverticulitis and sigmoid abscess requiring sigmoid colectomy with end colostomy and incidental left ureteral transection with subsequent left nephrostomy tube placement. She presented for colostomy reversal, ureteral reimplantation, and prolapse repair. Given the need for concomitant colon and ureteral reconstruction, the risk of infection was potentially higher if synthetic mesh were used. The patient therefore underwent transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft. Results: At 4 months’ follow-up the patient reported resolution of her symptoms and on examination she had no pelvic organ prolapse. Conclusion: Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy using autologous rectus fascia graft is a feasible option, especially in cases in which infection and synthetic mesh extrusion risks are potentially higher.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 19 2016

Fingerprint

Fascia
Transplants
Discitis
Colostomy
Prolapse
Sigmoid Colon
Infection
Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Diverticulitis
Colectomy
Replantation
Abscess
Colon

Keywords

  • Abdominal sacrocolpopexy
  • Autograft
  • Pelvic prolapse surgery
  • Rectus fascia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft. / Abraham, Nitya E.; Quirouet, Adrienne; Goldman, Howard B.

In: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, 19.03.2016, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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