Training professional home care staff to help reduce depression in elderly home care recipients

Paula Marcus, Gary J. Kennedy, Carol Wetherbee, Janice Korenblatt, Humberto Dorta, Melinda S. Lantz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depressive symptoms and undiagnosed major depression are prevalent among older home care patients. Treatment of depression enhances self-care, improves compliance with and adherence to medical care, improves treatment outcomes, and reduces the risk of suicide. Unfortunately, neither home care agencies nor office-based psychiatrists have traditionally provided the care needed to diagnose and treat this population. Depression is infrequently recognized among older home care patients, and typically becomes a persistent problem. The authors of this AAGP Psychiatry Rounds column sought to address this need through the training of professional home care staff to better identify persons with depression, and by better integrating psychiatric services within the home care agency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-16
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Geriatrics
Volume14
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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Home Care Services
Depression
Home Care Agencies
Psychiatry
Self Care
Suicide
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Training professional home care staff to help reduce depression in elderly home care recipients. / Marcus, Paula; Kennedy, Gary J.; Wetherbee, Carol; Korenblatt, Janice; Dorta, Humberto; Lantz, Melinda S.

In: Clinical Geriatrics, Vol. 14, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 13-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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