Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling

Bess H. Marcus, Michael G. Goldstein, Alan Jette, Laurey Simkin-Silverman, Bernardine M. Pinto, Felise B. Milan, Richard Washburn, Kevin Smith, William Rakowski, Catherine E. Dubé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. In accordance with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations, the current pilot study tests the feasibility and efficacy of a physician-delivered physical activity counseling intervention. Methods. A sequential comparison group design was used to examine change in self- reported physical activity between experimental (counseling and self-help materials) and control (usual care) patients at baseline and 6 weeks after the initial office visit. Patients in both groups were contacted by telephone 2 weeks after their office visit and asked about the physical activity counseling at their most recent physician visit. Experimental patients also received a follow-up appointment to discuss physical activity with their physician 4 weeks after their initial visit. Results. Counseling was feasible for physicians to do and produced short-term increases in physical activity levels. Both groups increased their physical activity, but the increase in physical activity was greater for patients who reported receiving a greater number of counseling messages. Conclusions. Physician-delivered physical activity interventions may be an effective way to achieve widespread improvements in the physical activity of middle-aged and older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-388
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Counseling
Exercise
Physicians
Office Visits
Advisory Committees
Telephone
Patient Care
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • exercise
  • patient education
  • primary care physicians
  • psychological theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Marcus, B. H., Goldstein, M. G., Jette, A., Simkin-Silverman, L., Pinto, B. M., Milan, F. B., ... Dubé, C. E. (1997). Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling. Preventive Medicine, 26(3), 382-388. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.1997.0158

Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling. / Marcus, Bess H.; Goldstein, Michael G.; Jette, Alan; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey; Pinto, Bernardine M.; Milan, Felise B.; Washburn, Richard; Smith, Kevin; Rakowski, William; Dubé, Catherine E.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 26, No. 3, 05.1997, p. 382-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcus, BH, Goldstein, MG, Jette, A, Simkin-Silverman, L, Pinto, BM, Milan, FB, Washburn, R, Smith, K, Rakowski, W & Dubé, CE 1997, 'Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling', Preventive Medicine, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 382-388. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.1997.0158
Marcus BH, Goldstein MG, Jette A, Simkin-Silverman L, Pinto BM, Milan FB et al. Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling. Preventive Medicine. 1997 May;26(3):382-388. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.1997.0158
Marcus, Bess H. ; Goldstein, Michael G. ; Jette, Alan ; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey ; Pinto, Bernardine M. ; Milan, Felise B. ; Washburn, Richard ; Smith, Kevin ; Rakowski, William ; Dubé, Catherine E. / Training physicians to conduct physical activity counseling. In: Preventive Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 382-388.
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