The vexatious vital: Neither clinical measurements by nurses nor an electronic monitor provides accurate measurements of respiratory rate in triage

Paris B. Lovett, Jason M. Buchwald, Kai Stürmann, Polly Bijur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

130 Scopus citations

Abstract

Of all the vital signs, only respiratory rate is still measured clinically in most US triage systems. Previous studies have demonstrated the inaccuracy, poor interobserver agreement, and low variability of routine measurements of respiratory rate. We assess the variability and accuracy of triage nurses' measurements of respiratory rate against a criterion standard. Also, we assess electronic measurement of respiratory rate against the same criterion standard. Consecutive patients presenting to an urban teaching emergency department (ED) were enrolled in this prospective study. Electronic measurement of respiratory rate was recorded throughout the triage encounter when nurses were recording measurements of respiratory rate. Electronic respiratory rate was measured using transthoracic impedance plethysmography. Immediately after each triage evaluation, criterion standard measurements of respiratory rate were made by research assistants using the World Health Organization recommendation of auscultation or observation for 60 seconds. We enrolled 159 patients. Variability was low for triage nurses' measurements of respiratory rate (SD 3.3) and electronic measurement of respiratory rate (SD 4.1) compared with criterion standard measurements of respiratory rate (SD 4.8; P<.05). Triage nurses' measurements of respiratory rate and electronic measurement of respiratory rate showed low sensitivity in detecting bradypnea and tachypnea. In a Bland-Altman analysis, triage nurses' measurements of respiratory rate and electronic measurement of respiratory rate showed poor agreement with criterion standard measurements of respiratory rate. Subgroup analysis of patients presenting with cardiac and respiratory symptoms yielded similar results. Neither triage nurses nor an electronic monitor provides accurate measurements of respiratory rate in the ED. Emergency physicians should search for new electronic modalities for measuring respiratory rate to bring respiratory rate into line with other vital signs. Emergency physicians should also consider new clinical strategies for measuring respiratory rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of emergency medicine
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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