The venous distension sign: A diagnostic sign of intracranial hypotension at MR imaging of the brain

Richard I. Farb, R. Forghani, S. K. Lee, D. J. Mikulis, R. Agid

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with intracranial hypotension (IH) demonstrate intracranial venous enlargement with a characteristic change in contour of the transverse sinus seen on routine T1-weighted sagittal imaging. In IH, the inferior margin of the midportion of the dominant transverse sinus acquires a distended convex appearance; we have termed this the venous distension sign (VDS). This is distinct from the normal appearance of this segment, which usually has a slightly concave or straight lower margin. This sign is introduced, and its performance as a test for the presence of this disease is evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The transverse sinuses on T1-weighted sagittal imaging of 15 patients with IH and 15 control patients were independently assessed in a blinded fashion by 3 readers for the presence of a VDS. A present or absent VDS was determined for each patient by each reader, and a consensus result for each patient was determined by unanimity or majority rule. RESULTS: Using the VDS, the readers correctly identified 93% (14 of 15) of the IH patients and similarly 93% (14 of 15) of the control patients. There was a high rate of agreement among the readers for the interpretation of the VDS (multirater κ = 0.82). The overall sensitivity of the VDS for the diagnosis of intracranial hypotension was 94%. Specificity was also 94%. CONCLUSION: The VDS appears to be an accurate test for the presence or absence of IH and may be helpful in the evaluation of these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1489-1493
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Hypotension
Neuroimaging
Transverse Sinuses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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The venous distension sign : A diagnostic sign of intracranial hypotension at MR imaging of the brain. / Farb, Richard I.; Forghani, R.; Lee, S. K.; Mikulis, D. J.; Agid, R.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.09.2007, p. 1489-1493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farb, Richard I. ; Forghani, R. ; Lee, S. K. ; Mikulis, D. J. ; Agid, R. / The venous distension sign : A diagnostic sign of intracranial hypotension at MR imaging of the brain. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2007 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 1489-1493.
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