The use of bi-planar tissue expanders to augment abdominal domain in a pediatric intestinal transplant recipient

Joshua Weiner, June Wu, Mercedes Martinez, Steven Lobritto, Nadia Ovchinsky, Christine Rohde, Adam Griesemer, Tomoaki Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for SBS. However, patients with SBS often have decreased abdominal capacity, which makes size-matching of donor organs more difficult, thus decreasing organ availability. Reported approaches for addressing this problem include surgically reducing the graft size, leaving an open abdomen for a prolonged period, and cotransplanting rectus fascia as a non-vascularized allograft. Each approach has significant disadvantages. There has been one previous report of tissue expanders used intra-abdominally and two reports of subcutaneous use to increase intra-abdominal capacity prior to transplantation. We report the first use of bi-planar expander placement for this purpose. In our case, a two-yr-old male child with SBS due to malrotation was treated with tissue expanders 10 months prior to intestinal transplantation, thus allowing transplantation of a larger graft with the ability to close the abdomen safely. There were no complications, and the patient is now doing well and tolerating diet off PN. The use of tissue expanders prior to intestinal transplantation is a promising approach for such patients and avoids the morbidity associated with other approaches. This approach requires a multidisciplinary effort by gastroenterology, transplant surgery, and plastic surgery teams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tissue Expansion Devices
Transplantation
Pediatrics
Transplants
Abdomen
Fascia
Gastroenterology
Plastic Surgery
Allografts
Transplant Recipients
Tissue Donors
Diet
Morbidity

Keywords

  • abdominal compartment syndrome
  • intestinal transplantation
  • pediatric transplantation
  • tissue expander

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Transplantation

Cite this

The use of bi-planar tissue expanders to augment abdominal domain in a pediatric intestinal transplant recipient. / Weiner, Joshua; Wu, June; Martinez, Mercedes; Lobritto, Steven; Ovchinsky, Nadia; Rohde, Christine; Griesemer, Adam; Kato, Tomoaki.

In: Pediatric Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 5, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiner, Joshua ; Wu, June ; Martinez, Mercedes ; Lobritto, Steven ; Ovchinsky, Nadia ; Rohde, Christine ; Griesemer, Adam ; Kato, Tomoaki. / The use of bi-planar tissue expanders to augment abdominal domain in a pediatric intestinal transplant recipient. In: Pediatric Transplantation. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 5.
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