The success of microsurgical penile revascularization in treating arteriogenic impotence.

A. Melman, R. Riccardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The treatment of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction with revascularization techniques has been controversial both in terms of its use and the type of surgical repair. Success rates reported in the literature are based almost exclusively on patient testimonial, without the use of objective post-operative criteria. At our institution from 7/88 through 8/91, 18 patients were treated for arteriogenic impotence using microsurgical penile revascularization. The patient population ranged in age from 23 to 64 years, and each patient underwent a complete history and physical examination, serum hormone testing, psychological evaluation of patient and partner, biothesiometry, penile plethysmography, nocturnal penile tumescence/rigidity testing with a Rigiscan device, and selective pudendal arteriography. One patient was status post a pelvic fracture, 2 lacked identifiable risk factors, 2 had diabetes, 6 were heavy smokers, and 7 had hypertension. Pre-operatively each patient had a suspicious medical history, abnormal plethysmography, abnormal Rigiscan testing, and a hemodynamically significant lesion on angiography. Revascularization was done by anastomosing the inferior epigastric artery to the deep dorsal veing and dorsal artery, or the deep dorsal vein alone if both arteries were atretic. Postoperatively, all 18 patients underwent a personal interview, repeat penile plethysmography, and repeat Rigiscan testing. Six patients reports successful coitus and an additional four were having coitus with the aid of intracavernous pharmacotherapy. Seventy-eight percent (14/18) had improved tracings on penile plethysmography, and 56% (10/18) had normal erectile capability by Rigiscan testing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalInternational journal of impotence research : official journal of the International Society for Impotence Research
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1993

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Vasculogenic Impotence
Plethysmography
Coitus
Angiography
Arteries
Epigastric Arteries
Penile Erection
Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Examination
Veins
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

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abstract = "The treatment of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction with revascularization techniques has been controversial both in terms of its use and the type of surgical repair. Success rates reported in the literature are based almost exclusively on patient testimonial, without the use of objective post-operative criteria. At our institution from 7/88 through 8/91, 18 patients were treated for arteriogenic impotence using microsurgical penile revascularization. The patient population ranged in age from 23 to 64 years, and each patient underwent a complete history and physical examination, serum hormone testing, psychological evaluation of patient and partner, biothesiometry, penile plethysmography, nocturnal penile tumescence/rigidity testing with a Rigiscan device, and selective pudendal arteriography. One patient was status post a pelvic fracture, 2 lacked identifiable risk factors, 2 had diabetes, 6 were heavy smokers, and 7 had hypertension. Pre-operatively each patient had a suspicious medical history, abnormal plethysmography, abnormal Rigiscan testing, and a hemodynamically significant lesion on angiography. Revascularization was done by anastomosing the inferior epigastric artery to the deep dorsal veing and dorsal artery, or the deep dorsal vein alone if both arteries were atretic. Postoperatively, all 18 patients underwent a personal interview, repeat penile plethysmography, and repeat Rigiscan testing. Six patients reports successful coitus and an additional four were having coitus with the aid of intracavernous pharmacotherapy. Seventy-eight percent (14/18) had improved tracings on penile plethysmography, and 56{\%} (10/18) had normal erectile capability by Rigiscan testing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
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