The role of group configuration in the social transmission of memory: Evidence from identical and reconfigured groups

Hae Yoon Choi, Helena M. Blumen, Adam R. Congleton, Suparna Rajaram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collaborating with others during recall shapes both group and individual memories. Individuals contribute less when recalling in groups than when recalling alone, a phenomenon called collaborative inhibition. In contrast, collaboration improves post-collaborative individual memory by providing re-exposure to information that would have been otherwise forgotten. Collaboration also influences collective memory-the overlap in post-collaborative memory among group members. We examined the role of group configuration on such transmission of memory by varying group configuration across repeated recalls. Participants (N = 162) studied words and completed three recall sessions in one of three conditions (N = 54/condition): Individual-Individual-Individual (Control), Collaborative-Collaborative (Identical group)-Individual and Collaborative-Collaborative (Reconfigured group)-Individual. Collaborative inhibition occurred in both the Identical and Reconfigured groups during the first recall but disappeared in the Reconfigured groups during the second recall. Post-collaborative individual memory was greater following Reconfigured than Identical group collaboration. This pattern reversed for collective memories; repeated collaboration increased overlap in the remembered and forgotten items in Identical groups compared to Reconfigured groups. Finally, Reconfigured groups provided a quantifiable index of the influence of distal partners (i.e., no direct collaboration involved) on post-collaborative individual memory. We conclude that group configuration has powerful consequences on the amount, the similarity and the variety of memory representations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-80
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2014

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Social Transmission
Inhibition (Psychology)
Overlap
Collective Memory
Distal

Keywords

  • Collaborative inhibition
  • Collaborative memory
  • Collective memory
  • Proximal-distal partners
  • Reconfigured groups
  • Social transmission of memory.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The role of group configuration in the social transmission of memory : Evidence from identical and reconfigured groups. / Choi, Hae Yoon; Blumen, Helena M.; Congleton, Adam R.; Rajaram, Suparna.

In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 02.01.2014, p. 65-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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