The role of dietary proteins among persons with diabetes.

Jeannette M. Beasley, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examining the role of dietary protein and establishing intake guidelines among individuals with diabetes is complex. The 2013 American Diabetes Association (ADA) standards of care recommend an individualized approach to decision making with regard to protein intake and dietary macronutrient composition. Needs may vary based on cardiometabolic risk factors and renal function. Among individuals with impaired renal function, the ADA recommends reducing protein intake to 0.8-1.0 g/kg per day in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to 0.8 g/kg per day in the later stages of CKD. Epidemiological studies suggest animal protein may increase risk of diabetes; however, few data are available to suggest how protein sources influence diabetes complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348
Number of pages1
JournalCurrent Atherosclerosis Reports
Volume15
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dietary Proteins
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Kidney
Proteins
Diabetes Complications
Standard of Care
Epidemiologic Studies
Decision Making
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The role of dietary proteins among persons with diabetes. / Beasley, Jeannette M.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith.

In: Current Atherosclerosis Reports, Vol. 15, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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