The role of cingulate cortex in the detection of errors with and without awareness: A high-density electrical mapping study

Redmond G. O'Connell, Paul M. Dockree, Mark A. Bellgrove, Simon P. Kelly, Robert Hester, Hugh Garavan, Ian H. Robertson, John J. Foxe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

235 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Error-processing research has demonstrated that the brain uses a specialized neural network to detect errors during task performance but the brain regions necessary for conscious awareness of an error are poorly understood. In the present study we show that two well-known error-related event-related potential (ERP) components, the error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) have a differential relationship with awareness during performance of a manual response inhibition task optimized to examine error awareness. While the ERN was unaffected by the participants' conscious experience of errors, the Pe was only seen when participants were aware of committing an error. Source localization of these components indicated that the ERN was generated by a caudal region of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) while the Pe was associated with contributions from a more anterior ACC region and the posterior cingulate-precuneus. Tonic EEG measures of cortical arousal were correlated with individual rates of error awareness and showed a specific relationship with the amplitude of the Pe. The latter finding is consistent with evidence that the Pe represents a P3-like facilitation of information processing modulated by subcortical arousal systems. Our data suggest that the ACC might participate in both preconscious and conscious error detection and that cortical arousal provides a necessary setting condition for error awareness. These findings may be particularly important in the context of clinical studies in which a proper understanding of self-monitoring deficits requires an explicit measurement of error awareness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2571-2579
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Gyrus Cinguli
Arousal
Parietal Lobe
Brain
Task Performance and Analysis
Automatic Data Processing
Evoked Potentials
Electroencephalography
Research

Keywords

  • Cortical arousal
  • ERP
  • Error positivity
  • Error processing
  • Error-related negativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

O'Connell, R. G., Dockree, P. M., Bellgrove, M. A., Kelly, S. P., Hester, R., Garavan, H., ... Foxe, J. J. (2007). The role of cingulate cortex in the detection of errors with and without awareness: A high-density electrical mapping study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 25(8), 2571-2579. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05477.x

The role of cingulate cortex in the detection of errors with and without awareness : A high-density electrical mapping study. / O'Connell, Redmond G.; Dockree, Paul M.; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Kelly, Simon P.; Hester, Robert; Garavan, Hugh; Robertson, Ian H.; Foxe, John J.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 25, No. 8, 04.2007, p. 2571-2579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Connell, RG, Dockree, PM, Bellgrove, MA, Kelly, SP, Hester, R, Garavan, H, Robertson, IH & Foxe, JJ 2007, 'The role of cingulate cortex in the detection of errors with and without awareness: A high-density electrical mapping study', European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 2571-2579. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05477.x
O'Connell, Redmond G. ; Dockree, Paul M. ; Bellgrove, Mark A. ; Kelly, Simon P. ; Hester, Robert ; Garavan, Hugh ; Robertson, Ian H. ; Foxe, John J. / The role of cingulate cortex in the detection of errors with and without awareness : A high-density electrical mapping study. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 2571-2579.
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