The reported sex and surgery satisfactions of 28 postoperative male-to- female transsexual patients

Jamil Rehman, Simcha Lazer, Alexandru E. Benet, Leah C. Schaefer, Arnold Melman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From 1980 to July 1997 sixty-one male-to-female gender transformation surgeries were performed at our university center by one author (A.M.). Data were collected from patients who had surgery up to 1994 (n = 47) to obtain a minimum follow-up of 3 years; 28 patients were contacted. A mail questionnaire was supplemented by personal interviews with 11 patients and telephone interviews with remaining patients to obtain and clarify additional information. Physical and functional results of surgery were judged to be good, with few patients requiting additional corrective surgery. General satisfaction was expressed over the quality of cosmetic (normal appearing genitalia) and functional (ability to perceive orgasm) results. Follow-up showed satisfied who believed they had normal appearing genitalia and the ability to experience orgasm. Most patients were able to return to their jobs and live a more satisfactory social and personal life. One significant outcome was the importance of proper preparation of patients for surgery and especially the need for additional postoperative psychotherapy. None of the patients regretted having had surgery. However, some were, to a degree, disappointed because of difficulties experienced postoperatively in adjusting satisfactorily as women both in their relationships with men and in living their lives generally as women. Findings of this study make a strong case for making a change in the Harry Benjamin Standards of Care to include a period of postoperative psychotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-89
Number of pages19
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Orgasm
Aptitude
Genitalia
Psychotherapy
Interviews
Surgery
Transsexual
Postal Service
Standard of Care
Postoperative Period
Cosmetics
Appearings
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telephone
Physical
Personal Life
Sixties
Questionnaire
Social Life

Keywords

  • Gender dysphoria
  • Gender dysphoria psychotherapy
  • Long-term follow-up
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • Sex change
  • Sex reassignment surgery
  • Sexual adjustment
  • Transsexualism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The reported sex and surgery satisfactions of 28 postoperative male-to- female transsexual patients. / Rehman, Jamil; Lazer, Simcha; Benet, Alexandru E.; Schaefer, Leah C.; Melman, Arnold.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 28, No. 1, 1999, p. 71-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rehman, Jamil ; Lazer, Simcha ; Benet, Alexandru E. ; Schaefer, Leah C. ; Melman, Arnold. / The reported sex and surgery satisfactions of 28 postoperative male-to- female transsexual patients. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 1999 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 71-89.
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