The relationship of HIV treatment acceptance and adherence to psyschosocial factors among injecting drug users

P. Demas, E. E. Schoenbaum, A. E. Hirky, T. A. Wills, L. S. Doll, D. M. Hartel, R. S. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seropositive injecting drug users (n = 135) participating in methadone maintenance treatment were assessed for HIV treatment behaviors, psychosocial adjustment, and HIV- and medication-specific attitudes and beliefs. Acceptance was associated with greater beliefs in zidovudine (ZDV) efficacy and ZDV as a source of control and hope. Higher ZDV control/hope beliefs were associated with both higher adherence and longer treatment duration. Lower adherence was associated with symptomatic disease stage, and alcohol/drug coping. Female gender and public assistance were associated with shorter duration of treatment. ZDV side effects and distrust of government HIV policy and HIV medications were not uncommon, but were not clearly associated with treatment behaviors. The results suggest that viewing HIV treatment as a source of control and hope may function as a motivator of treatment behaviors. This and other HIV-specific beliefs, gender issues, disease status, and psychosocial adjustment are important areas for further intervention and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-291
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Compliance
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Demas, P., Schoenbaum, E. E., Hirky, A. E., Wills, T. A., Doll, L. S., Hartel, D. M., & Klein, R. S. (1998). The relationship of HIV treatment acceptance and adherence to psyschosocial factors among injecting drug users. AIDS and Behavior, 2(4), 283-291.