The relation between cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep complaints in nondemented older adults: Results from the Bronx Aging Study

Timothy Schmutte, Shelby Freedman Harris, Ross Levin, Richard Zweig, Mindy Joy Katz, Richard B. Lipton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-reported sleep complaints and current cognitive functioning were assessed in 375 nondemented participants ages 75 to 85 years (134 men and 241 women) as part of enrollment in the Bronx aging study, an ongoing longitudinal community-based study of cognitive aging. This study only reports on the baseline data collected from 1980 to 1983. Sleep complaints were common, occurring in about 25% of the sample. Furthermore, after controlling for depression, use of hypnotic medication, physical morbidity, age, and education, participants who reported longer sleep onset latencies performed significantly worse on measures of verbal knowledge, long-term memory and fund of information, and visuospatial reasoning. Participants who reported longer sleep durations did significantly worse on a measure of verbal short-term memory. These results suggest that perceived sleep is related to select objective cognitive abilities even when accounting for commonly recognized mediating variables, such as depression, medical comorbidity, age, or use of hypnotic medication. Given the restricted range of this nondemented sample, these results may underestimate the relation between cognitive abilities and sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-56
Number of pages18
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Sleep
Aptitude
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Depression
Long-Term Memory
Financial Management
Short-Term Memory
Longitudinal Studies
Comorbidity
Morbidity
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The relation between cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep complaints in nondemented older adults : Results from the Bronx Aging Study. / Schmutte, Timothy; Harris, Shelby Freedman; Levin, Ross; Zweig, Richard; Katz, Mindy Joy; Lipton, Richard B.

In: Behavioral Sleep Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2007, p. 39-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{94a6382d693b45b5b39b8d82cdc28801,
title = "The relation between cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep complaints in nondemented older adults: Results from the Bronx Aging Study",
abstract = "Self-reported sleep complaints and current cognitive functioning were assessed in 375 nondemented participants ages 75 to 85 years (134 men and 241 women) as part of enrollment in the Bronx aging study, an ongoing longitudinal community-based study of cognitive aging. This study only reports on the baseline data collected from 1980 to 1983. Sleep complaints were common, occurring in about 25{\%} of the sample. Furthermore, after controlling for depression, use of hypnotic medication, physical morbidity, age, and education, participants who reported longer sleep onset latencies performed significantly worse on measures of verbal knowledge, long-term memory and fund of information, and visuospatial reasoning. Participants who reported longer sleep durations did significantly worse on a measure of verbal short-term memory. These results suggest that perceived sleep is related to select objective cognitive abilities even when accounting for commonly recognized mediating variables, such as depression, medical comorbidity, age, or use of hypnotic medication. Given the restricted range of this nondemented sample, these results may underestimate the relation between cognitive abilities and sleep.",
author = "Timothy Schmutte and Harris, {Shelby Freedman} and Ross Levin and Richard Zweig and Katz, {Mindy Joy} and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1207/s15402010bsm0501_3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "39--56",
journal = "Behavioral Sleep Medicine",
issn = "1540-2002",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relation between cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep complaints in nondemented older adults

T2 - Results from the Bronx Aging Study

AU - Schmutte, Timothy

AU - Harris, Shelby Freedman

AU - Levin, Ross

AU - Zweig, Richard

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Self-reported sleep complaints and current cognitive functioning were assessed in 375 nondemented participants ages 75 to 85 years (134 men and 241 women) as part of enrollment in the Bronx aging study, an ongoing longitudinal community-based study of cognitive aging. This study only reports on the baseline data collected from 1980 to 1983. Sleep complaints were common, occurring in about 25% of the sample. Furthermore, after controlling for depression, use of hypnotic medication, physical morbidity, age, and education, participants who reported longer sleep onset latencies performed significantly worse on measures of verbal knowledge, long-term memory and fund of information, and visuospatial reasoning. Participants who reported longer sleep durations did significantly worse on a measure of verbal short-term memory. These results suggest that perceived sleep is related to select objective cognitive abilities even when accounting for commonly recognized mediating variables, such as depression, medical comorbidity, age, or use of hypnotic medication. Given the restricted range of this nondemented sample, these results may underestimate the relation between cognitive abilities and sleep.

AB - Self-reported sleep complaints and current cognitive functioning were assessed in 375 nondemented participants ages 75 to 85 years (134 men and 241 women) as part of enrollment in the Bronx aging study, an ongoing longitudinal community-based study of cognitive aging. This study only reports on the baseline data collected from 1980 to 1983. Sleep complaints were common, occurring in about 25% of the sample. Furthermore, after controlling for depression, use of hypnotic medication, physical morbidity, age, and education, participants who reported longer sleep onset latencies performed significantly worse on measures of verbal knowledge, long-term memory and fund of information, and visuospatial reasoning. Participants who reported longer sleep durations did significantly worse on a measure of verbal short-term memory. These results suggest that perceived sleep is related to select objective cognitive abilities even when accounting for commonly recognized mediating variables, such as depression, medical comorbidity, age, or use of hypnotic medication. Given the restricted range of this nondemented sample, these results may underestimate the relation between cognitive abilities and sleep.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34047257838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34047257838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1207/s15402010bsm0501_3

DO - 10.1207/s15402010bsm0501_3

M3 - Article

C2 - 17313323

AN - SCOPUS:34047257838

VL - 5

SP - 39

EP - 56

JO - Behavioral Sleep Medicine

JF - Behavioral Sleep Medicine

SN - 1540-2002

IS - 1

ER -