The protective effect of AIDS-related behavioral change among injection drug users: A cross-national study

Don C. Des Jarlais, Patricia Friedmann, Holly Hagan, Samuel R. Friedman E

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. This study assessed the relationship between self-reported acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) behavioral change and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus among injection drug users. Methods. The study sample involved 4419 injection drug users recruited from drug abuse treatment and nontreatment settings in 11 cities in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia, The World Health Organization multisite risk behavior questionnaire was used, and either blood or saliva samples for HIV testing were obtained. Subjects were asked, "Since you first heard about AIDS, have you done anything to avoid getting AIM?" Results. The protective odds ratio for behavioral change against being infected with HIV was 0.50 (95% confidence interval = 0.42, 0.59). White there was important variation across sites, the relationship remained consistent across both demographic and drug use history subgroups. Conclusions. Injection drug users are capable of modifying their HIV risk behaviors and reporting accurately on behavioral changes. These behavioral changes are associated with their avoidance of HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1780-1785
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume86
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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