The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with disease severity in an urban pediatric critical care unit

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Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among patients admitted to a Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) in an urban children’s hospital, and to assess if there is a correlation between vitamin D level and disease severity. Patients and Methods. Patients (216) between the ages of 1-21 years admitted to the PCCU in a children’s hospital, excluding those readmitted with a previous vitamin D level, were enrolled. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured in all patients within 24 h of admission to the PCCU. The severity of patient illness was assessed by the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score determined on admission. Results. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 28% of patients and vitamin D insufficiency was found in 47% of patients. Adolescent age group, female gender, Black race, winter season, and increasing BMI were determined to be risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D level and PELOD score (p=0.09). There were six deaths (3%), 5 (83%) of which occurred in patients with low vitamin D levels. Total serum calcium levels correlated with vitamin D (p=0.005) and PELOD score (p=0.001). However, ionized calcium levels did not significantly correlate with vitamin D (p=0.62) or PELOD score (p=0.26). Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is common in children admitted to an urban inner city PCCU, with 75% of patients having abnormal levels. We did not find a significant correlation between disease severity as measured by PELOD score and vitamin D level in a heterogeneous group of critically ill children. Total serum calcium levels significantly correlated with vitamin D and disease severity in this population. There appears to be an association between vitamin D deficiency and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalEndocrine Regulations
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Vitamin D Deficiency
Critical Care
Vitamin D
Organ Dysfunction Scores
Pediatrics
Calcium
Serum
Urban Hospitals
Critical Illness
Age Groups

Keywords

  • Children
  • Critically ill
  • Disease severity
  • Hypocalcemia
  • ICU
  • Mortality
  • Pediatrics
  • PELOD
  • Prevalence
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

@article{7d18e89024bd4e6db235ca21edd091bd,
title = "The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with disease severity in an urban pediatric critical care unit",
abstract = "Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among patients admitted to a Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) in an urban children’s hospital, and to assess if there is a correlation between vitamin D level and disease severity. Patients and Methods. Patients (216) between the ages of 1-21 years admitted to the PCCU in a children’s hospital, excluding those readmitted with a previous vitamin D level, were enrolled. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured in all patients within 24 h of admission to the PCCU. The severity of patient illness was assessed by the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score determined on admission. Results. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 28{\%} of patients and vitamin D insufficiency was found in 47{\%} of patients. Adolescent age group, female gender, Black race, winter season, and increasing BMI were determined to be risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D level and PELOD score (p=0.09). There were six deaths (3{\%}), 5 (83{\%}) of which occurred in patients with low vitamin D levels. Total serum calcium levels correlated with vitamin D (p=0.005) and PELOD score (p=0.001). However, ionized calcium levels did not significantly correlate with vitamin D (p=0.62) or PELOD score (p=0.26). Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is common in children admitted to an urban inner city PCCU, with 75{\%} of patients having abnormal levels. We did not find a significant correlation between disease severity as measured by PELOD score and vitamin D level in a heterogeneous group of critically ill children. Total serum calcium levels significantly correlated with vitamin D and disease severity in this population. There appears to be an association between vitamin D deficiency and mortality.",
keywords = "Children, Critically ill, Disease severity, Hypocalcemia, ICU, Mortality, Pediatrics, PELOD, Prevalence, Vitamin D",
author = "M. Ayulo and Chhavi Katyal and Ch Agarwal and T. Sweberg and Deepa Rastogi and Markowitz, {Morri E.} and Ushay, {Henry Michael}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.4149/endo_2014_02_69",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "69--76",
journal = "Endocrine Regulations",
issn = "1210-0668",
publisher = "Institute of Experimental Endocrinology",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with disease severity in an urban pediatric critical care unit

AU - Ayulo, M.

AU - Katyal, Chhavi

AU - Agarwal, Ch

AU - Sweberg, T.

AU - Rastogi, Deepa

AU - Markowitz, Morri E.

AU - Ushay, Henry Michael

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among patients admitted to a Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) in an urban children’s hospital, and to assess if there is a correlation between vitamin D level and disease severity. Patients and Methods. Patients (216) between the ages of 1-21 years admitted to the PCCU in a children’s hospital, excluding those readmitted with a previous vitamin D level, were enrolled. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured in all patients within 24 h of admission to the PCCU. The severity of patient illness was assessed by the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score determined on admission. Results. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 28% of patients and vitamin D insufficiency was found in 47% of patients. Adolescent age group, female gender, Black race, winter season, and increasing BMI were determined to be risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D level and PELOD score (p=0.09). There were six deaths (3%), 5 (83%) of which occurred in patients with low vitamin D levels. Total serum calcium levels correlated with vitamin D (p=0.005) and PELOD score (p=0.001). However, ionized calcium levels did not significantly correlate with vitamin D (p=0.62) or PELOD score (p=0.26). Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is common in children admitted to an urban inner city PCCU, with 75% of patients having abnormal levels. We did not find a significant correlation between disease severity as measured by PELOD score and vitamin D level in a heterogeneous group of critically ill children. Total serum calcium levels significantly correlated with vitamin D and disease severity in this population. There appears to be an association between vitamin D deficiency and mortality.

AB - Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among patients admitted to a Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) in an urban children’s hospital, and to assess if there is a correlation between vitamin D level and disease severity. Patients and Methods. Patients (216) between the ages of 1-21 years admitted to the PCCU in a children’s hospital, excluding those readmitted with a previous vitamin D level, were enrolled. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured in all patients within 24 h of admission to the PCCU. The severity of patient illness was assessed by the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score determined on admission. Results. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 28% of patients and vitamin D insufficiency was found in 47% of patients. Adolescent age group, female gender, Black race, winter season, and increasing BMI were determined to be risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D level and PELOD score (p=0.09). There were six deaths (3%), 5 (83%) of which occurred in patients with low vitamin D levels. Total serum calcium levels correlated with vitamin D (p=0.005) and PELOD score (p=0.001). However, ionized calcium levels did not significantly correlate with vitamin D (p=0.62) or PELOD score (p=0.26). Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is common in children admitted to an urban inner city PCCU, with 75% of patients having abnormal levels. We did not find a significant correlation between disease severity as measured by PELOD score and vitamin D level in a heterogeneous group of critically ill children. Total serum calcium levels significantly correlated with vitamin D and disease severity in this population. There appears to be an association between vitamin D deficiency and mortality.

KW - Children

KW - Critically ill

KW - Disease severity

KW - Hypocalcemia

KW - ICU

KW - Mortality

KW - Pediatrics

KW - PELOD

KW - Prevalence

KW - Vitamin D

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U2 - 10.4149/endo_2014_02_69

DO - 10.4149/endo_2014_02_69

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 69

EP - 76

JO - Endocrine Regulations

JF - Endocrine Regulations

SN - 1210-0668

IS - 2

ER -