The PCH family member MAYP/PSTPIP2 directly regulates F-actin bundling and enhances filopodia formation and motility in macrophages

Violeta Chitu, Fiona J. Pixley, Frank P. Macaluso, Daniel R. Larson, John S. Condeelis, Yee Guide Yeung, E. Richard Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Macrophage actin-associated tyrosine phosphorylated protein (MAYP) belongs to the Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) family of proteins involved in the regulation of actin-based functions including cell adhesion and motility. In mouse macrophages, MAYP is tyrosine phosphorylated after activation of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which also induces actin reorganization, membrane ruffling, cell spreading, polarization, and migration. Because MAYP associates with F-actin, we investigated the function of MAYP in regulating actin organization in macrophages. Overexpression of MAYP decreased CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and increased filopodia formation, motility and CSF-1-mediated chemotaxis. The opposite phenotype was observed with reduced expression of MAYP, indicating that MAYP is a negative regulator of CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and positively regulates formation of filopodia and directional migration. Overexpression of MAYP led to a reduction in total macrophage F-actin content but was associated with increased actin bundling. Consistent with this, purified MAYP bundled F-actin and regulated its turnover in vitro. In addition, MAYP colocalized with cortical and filopodial F-actin in vivo. Because filopodia are postulated to increase directional motility by acting as environmental sensors, the MAYP-stimulated increase in directional movement may be at least partly explained by enhancement of filopodia formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2947-2959
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Biology of the Cell
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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Pseudopodia
Actins
Macrophages
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Tyrosine
Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptors
Membranes
Chemotaxis
Cell Adhesion
Cell Movement
Proteins
Cell Membrane
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

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The PCH family member MAYP/PSTPIP2 directly regulates F-actin bundling and enhances filopodia formation and motility in macrophages. / Chitu, Violeta; Pixley, Fiona J.; Macaluso, Frank P.; Larson, Daniel R.; Condeelis, John S.; Yeung, Yee Guide; Stanley, E. Richard.

In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. 16, No. 6, 2005, p. 2947-2959.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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