The pathological implications of protein glycation

M. Brownlee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperglycemia, the most obvious metabolic abnormality in diabetes, is the primary causal factor responsible for the development of diabetic microvascular complications. There is considerable evidence linking hyperglycemia with the accelerated formation of irreversible nonenzymatic advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs), which subsequently accumulate in vessel wall proteins. The development of long-term vascular complications associated with diabetes appears to be related to the accumulation of these AGEs. Compounds that inhibit the development of AGE formation prevent complications in animal models and, therefore, may prove useful in reducing chronic diabetes-related complications in patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-281
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Investigative Medicine
Volume18
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995

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Diabetes Complications
Hyperglycemia
Advanced Glycosylation End Products
Blood Vessels
Proteins
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Extracellular matrix
  • Inhibitors
  • Receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The pathological implications of protein glycation. / Brownlee, M.

In: Clinical and Investigative Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1995, p. 275-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brownlee, M. / The pathological implications of protein glycation. In: Clinical and Investigative Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 275-281.
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