The painful shoulder: Part II. Intrinsic disorders and impingement syndrome

J. D. Zuckerman, S. C. Mirabello, D. Newman, M. Gallagher, F. Cuomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intrinsic disorders that can cause shoulder pain include arthritis, gout, pseudogout and osteonecrosis. In its mildest form, impingement syndrome may cause only minimal discomfort. At its worst, impingement syndrome may lead to rotator cuff tear. Bicipital tendinitis and rupture of the biceps tendon may also be associated with impingement. Early rehabilitative intervention is important. Physical therapy is directed toward restoring range of motion and muscle strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-512
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume43
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Zuckerman, J. D., Mirabello, S. C., Newman, D., Gallagher, M., & Cuomo, F. (1991). The painful shoulder: Part II. Intrinsic disorders and impingement syndrome. American family physician, 43(2), 497-512.