The long-term efficacy and safety of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent, severe, and complicated clostridium difficile infection in 146 elderly individuals

Manasi Agrawal, Olga C. Aroniadis, Lawrence J. Brandt, Colleen Kelly, Sarah Freeman, Christina Surawicz, Elizabeth Broussard, Neil Stollman, Andrea Giovanelli, Becky Smith, Eugene Yen, Apurva Trivedi, Levi Hubble, Dina Kao, Thomas Borody, Sarah Finlayson, Arnab Ray, Robert Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the elderly has a higher prevalence, greater morbidity and mortality, and lower response to conventional treatment than the general population. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is highly effective therapy for CDI but has not been studied specifically in the elderly. This study aims to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of FMT for recurrent (RCDI), severe (SCDI), and complicated (CCDI) CDI in elderly patients. Methods: A multicenter, long-term follow-up study was performed with demographic, pre-FMT, and post-FMT data collected from elderly patients with RCDI, SCDI, and CCDI, through a 47-item questionnaire. Outcome measures included primary and secondary cure rates, early (<12 wk) and late (≥12 wk) recurrence rates, and adverse events (AEs), including post-FMT diagnoses. Results: Of 168 eligible patients, 146 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 68.5% were women. The mean (range) age was 78.6 (65 to 97) years and the follow-up period was 12.3 (1 to 48) months. FMT was performed for RCDI in 89 (61%), SCDI in 45 (30.8%), and CCDI in 12 (8.2%) patients. The primary and secondary cure rates were 82.9% and 95.9%, respectively. Early and late recurrences occurred in 25 and 6 patients, respectively. AEs included CDI-negative diarrhea in 7 (4.8%) and constipation in 4 (2.7%) patients. Serious AEs, recorded in 6 patients, were hospital admissions for CDI-related diarrhea, one of which culminated in death. New diagnoses post-FMT included microscopic colitis (2), Sjogren syndrome (1), follicular lymphoma (1), contact dermatitis and idiopathic Bence-Jones proteinuria (1), and laryngeal carcinoma (1) - all, however, were associated with predisposing factors. Conclusions: FMT is a safe and effective treatment option for RCDI, SCDI, and CCDI in elderly patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-407
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of clinical gastroenterology
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile infection
  • Elderly
  • Fecal microbiota transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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    Agrawal, M., Aroniadis, O. C., Brandt, L. J., Kelly, C., Freeman, S., Surawicz, C., Broussard, E., Stollman, N., Giovanelli, A., Smith, B., Yen, E., Trivedi, A., Hubble, L., Kao, D., Borody, T., Finlayson, S., Ray, A., & Smith, R. (2016). The long-term efficacy and safety of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent, severe, and complicated clostridium difficile infection in 146 elderly individuals. Journal of clinical gastroenterology, 50(5), 403-407. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0000000000000410