The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress

Jack P. Shonkoff, Andrew S. Garner, Benjamin S. Siegel, Mary I. Dobbins, Marian F. Earls, Laura McGuinn, John Pascoe, David L. Wood, Pamela C. High, Elaine Donoghue, Jill J. Fussell, Mary Margaret Gleason, Paula K. Jaudes, Veronnie F. Jones, David M. Rubin, Elaine E. Schulte, Michelle M. Macias, Carolyn Bridgemohan, Jill Fussell, Edward GoldsonLaura J. McGuinn, Carol Weitzman, Lynn Mowbray Wegner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1457 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in fields of inquiry as diverse as neuroscience, molecular biology, genomics, developmental psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and economics are catalyzing an important paradigm shift in our understanding of health and disease across the lifespan. This converging, multidisciplinary science of human development has profound implications for our ability to enhance the life prospects of children and to strengthen the social and economic fabric of society. Drawing on these multiple streams of investigation, this report presents an ecobiodevelopmental framework that illustrates how early experiences and environmental influences can leave a lasting signature on the genetic predispositions that affect emerging brain architecture and long-term health. The report also examines extensive evidence of the disruptive impacts of toxic stress, offering intriguing insights into causal mechanisms that link early adversity to later impairments in learning, behavior, and both physical and mental well-being. The implications of this framework for the practice of medicine, in general, and pediatrics, specifically, are potentially transformational. They suggest that many adult diseases should be viewed as developmental disorders that begin early in life and that persistent health disparities associated with poverty, discrimination, or maltreatment could be reduced by the alleviation of toxic stress in childhood. An ecobiodevelopmental framework also underscores the need for new thinking about the focus and boundaries of pediatric practice. It calls for pediatricians to serve as both front-line guardians of healthy child development and strategically positioned, community leaders to inform new science-based strategies that build strong foundations for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and lifelong health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poisons
Economics
Health
Pediatrics
Educational Status
Aptitude
Sociology
Human Development
Poverty
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Neurosciences
Child Development
Genomics
Molecular Biology
Epidemiology
Medicine
Learning
Efficiency
Brain

Keywords

  • Advocacy
  • Brain development
  • Disease prevention
  • Ecobiodevelopmental framework
  • Health disparities
  • Health promotion
  • Human capital development
  • New morbidity
  • Pediatric basic science
  • Social inequalities
  • Toxic stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shonkoff, J. P., Garner, A. S., Siegel, B. S., Dobbins, M. I., Earls, M. F., McGuinn, L., ... Wegner, L. M. (2012). The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress. Pediatrics, 129(1). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-2663

The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress. / Shonkoff, Jack P.; Garner, Andrew S.; Siegel, Benjamin S.; Dobbins, Mary I.; Earls, Marian F.; McGuinn, Laura; Pascoe, John; Wood, David L.; High, Pamela C.; Donoghue, Elaine; Fussell, Jill J.; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Jaudes, Paula K.; Jones, Veronnie F.; Rubin, David M.; Schulte, Elaine E.; Macias, Michelle M.; Bridgemohan, Carolyn; Fussell, Jill; Goldson, Edward; McGuinn, Laura J.; Weitzman, Carol; Wegner, Lynn Mowbray.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 129, No. 1, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shonkoff, JP, Garner, AS, Siegel, BS, Dobbins, MI, Earls, MF, McGuinn, L, Pascoe, J, Wood, DL, High, PC, Donoghue, E, Fussell, JJ, Gleason, MM, Jaudes, PK, Jones, VF, Rubin, DM, Schulte, EE, Macias, MM, Bridgemohan, C, Fussell, J, Goldson, E, McGuinn, LJ, Weitzman, C & Wegner, LM 2012, 'The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress', Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-2663
Shonkoff JP, Garner AS, Siegel BS, Dobbins MI, Earls MF, McGuinn L et al. The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress. Pediatrics. 2012 Jan 1;129(1). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-2663
Shonkoff, Jack P. ; Garner, Andrew S. ; Siegel, Benjamin S. ; Dobbins, Mary I. ; Earls, Marian F. ; McGuinn, Laura ; Pascoe, John ; Wood, David L. ; High, Pamela C. ; Donoghue, Elaine ; Fussell, Jill J. ; Gleason, Mary Margaret ; Jaudes, Paula K. ; Jones, Veronnie F. ; Rubin, David M. ; Schulte, Elaine E. ; Macias, Michelle M. ; Bridgemohan, Carolyn ; Fussell, Jill ; Goldson, Edward ; McGuinn, Laura J. ; Weitzman, Carol ; Wegner, Lynn Mowbray. / The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress. In: Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 129, No. 1.
@article{465c2b651aad4cc8aabfad13de3f5824,
title = "The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress",
abstract = "Advances in fields of inquiry as diverse as neuroscience, molecular biology, genomics, developmental psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and economics are catalyzing an important paradigm shift in our understanding of health and disease across the lifespan. This converging, multidisciplinary science of human development has profound implications for our ability to enhance the life prospects of children and to strengthen the social and economic fabric of society. Drawing on these multiple streams of investigation, this report presents an ecobiodevelopmental framework that illustrates how early experiences and environmental influences can leave a lasting signature on the genetic predispositions that affect emerging brain architecture and long-term health. The report also examines extensive evidence of the disruptive impacts of toxic stress, offering intriguing insights into causal mechanisms that link early adversity to later impairments in learning, behavior, and both physical and mental well-being. The implications of this framework for the practice of medicine, in general, and pediatrics, specifically, are potentially transformational. They suggest that many adult diseases should be viewed as developmental disorders that begin early in life and that persistent health disparities associated with poverty, discrimination, or maltreatment could be reduced by the alleviation of toxic stress in childhood. An ecobiodevelopmental framework also underscores the need for new thinking about the focus and boundaries of pediatric practice. It calls for pediatricians to serve as both front-line guardians of healthy child development and strategically positioned, community leaders to inform new science-based strategies that build strong foundations for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and lifelong health.",
keywords = "Advocacy, Brain development, Disease prevention, Ecobiodevelopmental framework, Health disparities, Health promotion, Human capital development, New morbidity, Pediatric basic science, Social inequalities, Toxic stress",
author = "Shonkoff, {Jack P.} and Garner, {Andrew S.} and Siegel, {Benjamin S.} and Dobbins, {Mary I.} and Earls, {Marian F.} and Laura McGuinn and John Pascoe and Wood, {David L.} and High, {Pamela C.} and Elaine Donoghue and Fussell, {Jill J.} and Gleason, {Mary Margaret} and Jaudes, {Paula K.} and Jones, {Veronnie F.} and Rubin, {David M.} and Schulte, {Elaine E.} and Macias, {Michelle M.} and Carolyn Bridgemohan and Jill Fussell and Edward Goldson and McGuinn, {Laura J.} and Carol Weitzman and Wegner, {Lynn Mowbray}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2011-2663",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "129",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress

AU - Shonkoff, Jack P.

AU - Garner, Andrew S.

AU - Siegel, Benjamin S.

AU - Dobbins, Mary I.

AU - Earls, Marian F.

AU - McGuinn, Laura

AU - Pascoe, John

AU - Wood, David L.

AU - High, Pamela C.

AU - Donoghue, Elaine

AU - Fussell, Jill J.

AU - Gleason, Mary Margaret

AU - Jaudes, Paula K.

AU - Jones, Veronnie F.

AU - Rubin, David M.

AU - Schulte, Elaine E.

AU - Macias, Michelle M.

AU - Bridgemohan, Carolyn

AU - Fussell, Jill

AU - Goldson, Edward

AU - McGuinn, Laura J.

AU - Weitzman, Carol

AU - Wegner, Lynn Mowbray

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - Advances in fields of inquiry as diverse as neuroscience, molecular biology, genomics, developmental psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and economics are catalyzing an important paradigm shift in our understanding of health and disease across the lifespan. This converging, multidisciplinary science of human development has profound implications for our ability to enhance the life prospects of children and to strengthen the social and economic fabric of society. Drawing on these multiple streams of investigation, this report presents an ecobiodevelopmental framework that illustrates how early experiences and environmental influences can leave a lasting signature on the genetic predispositions that affect emerging brain architecture and long-term health. The report also examines extensive evidence of the disruptive impacts of toxic stress, offering intriguing insights into causal mechanisms that link early adversity to later impairments in learning, behavior, and both physical and mental well-being. The implications of this framework for the practice of medicine, in general, and pediatrics, specifically, are potentially transformational. They suggest that many adult diseases should be viewed as developmental disorders that begin early in life and that persistent health disparities associated with poverty, discrimination, or maltreatment could be reduced by the alleviation of toxic stress in childhood. An ecobiodevelopmental framework also underscores the need for new thinking about the focus and boundaries of pediatric practice. It calls for pediatricians to serve as both front-line guardians of healthy child development and strategically positioned, community leaders to inform new science-based strategies that build strong foundations for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and lifelong health.

AB - Advances in fields of inquiry as diverse as neuroscience, molecular biology, genomics, developmental psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and economics are catalyzing an important paradigm shift in our understanding of health and disease across the lifespan. This converging, multidisciplinary science of human development has profound implications for our ability to enhance the life prospects of children and to strengthen the social and economic fabric of society. Drawing on these multiple streams of investigation, this report presents an ecobiodevelopmental framework that illustrates how early experiences and environmental influences can leave a lasting signature on the genetic predispositions that affect emerging brain architecture and long-term health. The report also examines extensive evidence of the disruptive impacts of toxic stress, offering intriguing insights into causal mechanisms that link early adversity to later impairments in learning, behavior, and both physical and mental well-being. The implications of this framework for the practice of medicine, in general, and pediatrics, specifically, are potentially transformational. They suggest that many adult diseases should be viewed as developmental disorders that begin early in life and that persistent health disparities associated with poverty, discrimination, or maltreatment could be reduced by the alleviation of toxic stress in childhood. An ecobiodevelopmental framework also underscores the need for new thinking about the focus and boundaries of pediatric practice. It calls for pediatricians to serve as both front-line guardians of healthy child development and strategically positioned, community leaders to inform new science-based strategies that build strong foundations for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and lifelong health.

KW - Advocacy

KW - Brain development

KW - Disease prevention

KW - Ecobiodevelopmental framework

KW - Health disparities

KW - Health promotion

KW - Human capital development

KW - New morbidity

KW - Pediatric basic science

KW - Social inequalities

KW - Toxic stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84855255591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84855255591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2011-2663

DO - 10.1542/peds.2011-2663

M3 - Article

C2 - 22201156

AN - SCOPUS:84855255591

VL - 129

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 1

ER -