The influence of pregnancy on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: Antepartum and postpartum changes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load

D. N. Burns, S. Landesman, H. Minkoff, D. J. Wright, D. Waters, R. M. Mitchell, A. Rubinstein, A. Willoughby, J. J. Goedert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the influence of pregnancy on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral lead by measuring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid levels during pregnancy and post partum. STUDY DESIGN: One or more plasma or serum specimens obtained before and during the third trimester, and at 2, 12, and 24 months post partum were available for 160 human immunodeficiency virus type 1- seropositive women enrolled in the Mothers and Infants Cohort Study between January 1986 and January 1991. All specimens were frozen and stored at - 70°C until analyzed in batch for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction. A multivariate longitudinal random effects model was developed to examine changes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid levels over time. RESULTS: Overall, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid levels rose significantly during the study period, particularly during the second year post partum (mean, 0.09 log per year; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.15 logs per year; p = 0.005). However, the mean slope during pregnancy was not significantly different from zero (p = 0.65). CONCLUSION: Pregnancy had little immediate effect on human immunodeficiency virus type l viral lead in most human immunodeficiency virus type 1-seropositive women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-359
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume178
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Pregnancy
  • Ribonucleic acid
  • Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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