The influence of Duffy blood group on renal allograft outcome in African Americans

Enver Akalin, John F. Neylan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. African American patients demonstrate higher rates of acute allograft rejection and lower kidney-graft survival compared with white patients. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) on red blood cells has been suggested to have an anti-inflammatory role by acting as a "chemokine sink." We investigated the relationship of Duffy blood group type to renal allograft outcome in African American patient population. Methods. A total of 163 African American kidney-transplant recipients were studied for Duffy blood group status. Patient outcomes were assessed at 6 to 42 months after transplantation and monitored for acute rejection episodes, graft function, and graft survival. Results. A total of 117 (71.8%) patients were Duffy (a-b-), 14 (8.6%) Duffy (a+b-), 21 (12.9%) Duffy (a-b+), and 11 (6.8%) Duffy (a+b+). No significant differences were observed among the groups with respect to median serum-creatinine values or the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute-rejection episodes. Although only 15.4% of the patients had Duffy (a+) antigen, none lost their allograft during the study period, and Kaplan-Meier graft survival was not significantly different compared to Duffy (a-) group (log-rank test, P=0.12). Duffy (a-b-) patients demonstrated lower allograft survival compared with the other three groups, although statistical significance was not reached (log-rank test P=0.15). Delayed graft function (DGF) was strongly associated with graft failure for only Duffy (a-b-) patients (log-rank test P=0.003). Conclusions. Duffy (a-b-) patients have lower allograft survival in the presence of DGF. DARC may attenuate the inflammatory effects of DGF by acting as a "chemokine sink," and DARC-negative patients may be more vulnerable to DGF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1496-1500
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume75
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Group Antigens
African Americans
Allografts
Kidney
Delayed Graft Function
Chemokines
Antigen Receptors
Graft Survival
Graft Rejection
Creatinine
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Transplantation
Erythrocytes
Transplants
Biopsy
Antigens
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

The influence of Duffy blood group on renal allograft outcome in African Americans. / Akalin, Enver; Neylan, John F.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 75, No. 9, 15.05.2003, p. 1496-1500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2e5fd75c9cd64426a546dcd2042e01b9,
title = "The influence of Duffy blood group on renal allograft outcome in African Americans",
abstract = "Background. African American patients demonstrate higher rates of acute allograft rejection and lower kidney-graft survival compared with white patients. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) on red blood cells has been suggested to have an anti-inflammatory role by acting as a {"}chemokine sink.{"} We investigated the relationship of Duffy blood group type to renal allograft outcome in African American patient population. Methods. A total of 163 African American kidney-transplant recipients were studied for Duffy blood group status. Patient outcomes were assessed at 6 to 42 months after transplantation and monitored for acute rejection episodes, graft function, and graft survival. Results. A total of 117 (71.8{\%}) patients were Duffy (a-b-), 14 (8.6{\%}) Duffy (a+b-), 21 (12.9{\%}) Duffy (a-b+), and 11 (6.8{\%}) Duffy (a+b+). No significant differences were observed among the groups with respect to median serum-creatinine values or the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute-rejection episodes. Although only 15.4{\%} of the patients had Duffy (a+) antigen, none lost their allograft during the study period, and Kaplan-Meier graft survival was not significantly different compared to Duffy (a-) group (log-rank test, P=0.12). Duffy (a-b-) patients demonstrated lower allograft survival compared with the other three groups, although statistical significance was not reached (log-rank test P=0.15). Delayed graft function (DGF) was strongly associated with graft failure for only Duffy (a-b-) patients (log-rank test P=0.003). Conclusions. Duffy (a-b-) patients have lower allograft survival in the presence of DGF. DARC may attenuate the inflammatory effects of DGF by acting as a {"}chemokine sink,{"} and DARC-negative patients may be more vulnerable to DGF.",
author = "Enver Akalin and Neylan, {John F.}",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1097/01.TP.0000061228.38243.26",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "1496--1500",
journal = "Transplantation",
issn = "0041-1337",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of Duffy blood group on renal allograft outcome in African Americans

AU - Akalin, Enver

AU - Neylan, John F.

PY - 2003/5/15

Y1 - 2003/5/15

N2 - Background. African American patients demonstrate higher rates of acute allograft rejection and lower kidney-graft survival compared with white patients. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) on red blood cells has been suggested to have an anti-inflammatory role by acting as a "chemokine sink." We investigated the relationship of Duffy blood group type to renal allograft outcome in African American patient population. Methods. A total of 163 African American kidney-transplant recipients were studied for Duffy blood group status. Patient outcomes were assessed at 6 to 42 months after transplantation and monitored for acute rejection episodes, graft function, and graft survival. Results. A total of 117 (71.8%) patients were Duffy (a-b-), 14 (8.6%) Duffy (a+b-), 21 (12.9%) Duffy (a-b+), and 11 (6.8%) Duffy (a+b+). No significant differences were observed among the groups with respect to median serum-creatinine values or the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute-rejection episodes. Although only 15.4% of the patients had Duffy (a+) antigen, none lost their allograft during the study period, and Kaplan-Meier graft survival was not significantly different compared to Duffy (a-) group (log-rank test, P=0.12). Duffy (a-b-) patients demonstrated lower allograft survival compared with the other three groups, although statistical significance was not reached (log-rank test P=0.15). Delayed graft function (DGF) was strongly associated with graft failure for only Duffy (a-b-) patients (log-rank test P=0.003). Conclusions. Duffy (a-b-) patients have lower allograft survival in the presence of DGF. DARC may attenuate the inflammatory effects of DGF by acting as a "chemokine sink," and DARC-negative patients may be more vulnerable to DGF.

AB - Background. African American patients demonstrate higher rates of acute allograft rejection and lower kidney-graft survival compared with white patients. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) on red blood cells has been suggested to have an anti-inflammatory role by acting as a "chemokine sink." We investigated the relationship of Duffy blood group type to renal allograft outcome in African American patient population. Methods. A total of 163 African American kidney-transplant recipients were studied for Duffy blood group status. Patient outcomes were assessed at 6 to 42 months after transplantation and monitored for acute rejection episodes, graft function, and graft survival. Results. A total of 117 (71.8%) patients were Duffy (a-b-), 14 (8.6%) Duffy (a+b-), 21 (12.9%) Duffy (a-b+), and 11 (6.8%) Duffy (a+b+). No significant differences were observed among the groups with respect to median serum-creatinine values or the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute-rejection episodes. Although only 15.4% of the patients had Duffy (a+) antigen, none lost their allograft during the study period, and Kaplan-Meier graft survival was not significantly different compared to Duffy (a-) group (log-rank test, P=0.12). Duffy (a-b-) patients demonstrated lower allograft survival compared with the other three groups, although statistical significance was not reached (log-rank test P=0.15). Delayed graft function (DGF) was strongly associated with graft failure for only Duffy (a-b-) patients (log-rank test P=0.003). Conclusions. Duffy (a-b-) patients have lower allograft survival in the presence of DGF. DARC may attenuate the inflammatory effects of DGF by acting as a "chemokine sink," and DARC-negative patients may be more vulnerable to DGF.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038586439&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038586439&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.TP.0000061228.38243.26

DO - 10.1097/01.TP.0000061228.38243.26

M3 - Article

C2 - 12792503

AN - SCOPUS:0038586439

VL - 75

SP - 1496

EP - 1500

JO - Transplantation

JF - Transplantation

SN - 0041-1337

IS - 9

ER -