The impact of on-site attending radiologist overnight coverage on radiology resident learning: a preliminary assessment

Netanel S. Berko, Terry L. Levin, Meir H. Scheinfeld

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to assess the impact of on-site attending radiologist overnight coverage on resident education during transition to 24/7 attending coverage. The study was exempted from IRB review. An anonymous survey was sent to 9 second year radiology residents who completed their first night call rotation (NC) with an attending radiologist (group 1) and 18 residents who completed their first NC prior to overnight attending coverage (group 2). This addressed anxiety level prior to NC, work pace, autonomy and confidence, and attending feedback, with responses graded on a five-point scale. Statistical analysis was performed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient. Diagnostic Radiology In-Training (DXIT(TM)) exam scores were collected prior to and following completion of the NC rotation, and results were compared. Case volume before and after the transition was recorded. p value <0.05 indicated statistical significance. Eight out of nine residents in group 1 and 16 out of/18 residents in group 2 completed the survey. Group 1 was more likely to report working at a comfortable pace (p = 0.008) and receiving attending feedback (p = 0.004) than group 2. A non-significant trend towards reduced anxiety prior to NC was present in group 1 (p = 0.077). No difference in independence (p = 0.918), autonomy (p = 0.635), or confidence during (p = 0.431) or after NC (p = 1.00) was identified. DXIT(TM) scores were not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.396). While overall case volume dictated by residents increased, fewer plain radiographs were dictated. Overnight attending coverage provides a more comfortable pace of study interpretation and increased attending feedback without decreasing resident independence or DXIT(TM) scores. Plain radiograph interpretation may need to be further emphasized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalEmergency Radiology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Radiology
Learning
Anxiety
Research Ethics Committees
Radiologists
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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The impact of on-site attending radiologist overnight coverage on radiology resident learning : a preliminary assessment. / Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

In: Emergency Radiology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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