The impact of geographic, ethnic, and demographic dynamics on the perception of beauty

Peter Niclas Broer, Sabrina Juran, Yuen Jong Liu, Katie E. Weichman, Neil Tanna, Marc E. Walker, Reuben Ng, John A. Persing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder, but influenced by the individual's geographic, ethnic, and demographic background and characteristics. In plastic surgery, objective measurements are used as a foundation for aesthetic evaluations. This study assumes interdependence between variables such as country of residence, sex, age, occupation, and aesthetic perception. METHODS: Computerized images of a model's face were generated with the ability to alter nasal characteristics and the projection of the lips and chin. A survey containing these modifiable images was sent to more than 13,000 plastic surgeons and laypeople in 50 different countries, who were able to virtually create a face that they felt to be the aesthetically "ideal" and most pleasing. Demographic information about the interviewees was obtained. RESULTS: Values of various aesthetic parameters of the nose were described along with their relationship to geography, demography, and occupation of the respondents. Interregional and ethnic comparison revealed that variables of country of residence, ethnicity, occupation (general public vs surgeon), and sex correlate along a 3-way dimension with the ideal projection of the lips and the chin. Significant interaction effects were found between variables of country of residence or ethnicity with occupation and sex of the respondents. CONCLUSIONS: What are considered the "ideal" aesthetics of the face are highly dependent on the individual's cultural and ethnic background and cannot simply and solely be defined by numeric values and divine proportions. As confirmed with this study, ethnic, demographic, and occupational factors impact peoples' perception of beauty significantly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Beauty
Esthetics
Occupations
Demography
Chin
Lip
Nose
Geography
Aptitude
Plastic Surgery
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons

Keywords

  • academic practice
  • Beauty
  • demographic impact
  • ethnic and cultural background
  • facial aesthetics
  • interaction effect
  • international
  • private practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The impact of geographic, ethnic, and demographic dynamics on the perception of beauty. / Broer, Peter Niclas; Juran, Sabrina; Liu, Yuen Jong; Weichman, Katie E.; Tanna, Neil; Walker, Marc E.; Ng, Reuben; Persing, John A.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 25, No. 2, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Broer, Peter Niclas ; Juran, Sabrina ; Liu, Yuen Jong ; Weichman, Katie E. ; Tanna, Neil ; Walker, Marc E. ; Ng, Reuben ; Persing, John A. / The impact of geographic, ethnic, and demographic dynamics on the perception of beauty. In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 2.
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