The immunohistological diagnosis of E. coli O157: H7 colitis: Possible association with colonic ischemia

Chinyu Su, Lawrence J. Brandt, Samuel H. Sigal, Elaine Alt, J. J. Steinberg, Kathleen Patterson, Phillip I. Tarr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: E. coli O157:H7 may cause hemorrhagic colitis resembling ischemic colitis. Diagnosis is usually made by finding sorbitol-negative colonies on MacConkey agar that react with O157 and H7 antisera. Most ischemic colitis is idiopathic, but some may be caused by E. coli O157:H7, inasmuch as this organism can produce fibrin thrombi in colon vasculature. The objectives of this study were to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 infection can be diagnosed retrospectively from paraffin blocks of colon sections and whether an association exists between E. coli O157:H7 infection and colonic ischemia. Methods: Paraffin-embedded sections of normal colon (n = 2) and various colitides [ischemic (n = 11), E. coli O157:H7 (n = 2), IBD (n = 8) and pseudomembranous (n = 3)] were used. Sections were deparaffinized, rehydrated, incubated with 3% peroxide in methanol, rinsed, and incubated with peroxidase-labeled antibody isolated from goats immunized with whole E. coli O157: H7. Sections were stained with peroxidase chromagen reagent and counter-stained with hematoxylin. Coarse, granular, orange-brown staining was considered positive. To determine the localization of the chromagen deposits, three cases that stained positive, including one of the culture-proved E. coli O157:H7 colitis and two of colonic ischemia, were processed for electron microscopy. Results: Both cases (100%) of E. coli O157:H7 colitis and three of 11 (27.3%) cases of ischemic colitis stained positive by light microscopy. In one culture-proved case, electron microscopy demonstrated staining of bacillary structures; in two cases of colonic ischemia, extensive deposits of chromagen material were present that were associated neither with inflammatory cells nor with bacterial forms. Conclusions: Immunoperoxidase staining of archival sections may be used to diagnose E. coli O157:H7 infection. An etiological role for this organism is possible in some cases of colonic ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1055-1059
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume93
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998

Fingerprint

Escherichia coli O157
Colitis
Ischemia
Ischemic Colitis
Colon
Staining and Labeling
Paraffin
Peroxidase
Electron Microscopy
Infection
Sorbitol
Peroxides
Hematoxylin
Fibrin
Goats
Agar
Methanol
Immune Sera
Microscopy
Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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The immunohistological diagnosis of E. coli O157 : H7 colitis: Possible association with colonic ischemia. / Su, Chinyu; Brandt, Lawrence J.; Sigal, Samuel H.; Alt, Elaine; Steinberg, J. J.; Patterson, Kathleen; Tarr, Phillip I.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 93, No. 7, 07.1998, p. 1055-1059.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Su, Chinyu ; Brandt, Lawrence J. ; Sigal, Samuel H. ; Alt, Elaine ; Steinberg, J. J. ; Patterson, Kathleen ; Tarr, Phillip I. / The immunohistological diagnosis of E. coli O157 : H7 colitis: Possible association with colonic ischemia. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1998 ; Vol. 93, No. 7. pp. 1055-1059.
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title = "The immunohistological diagnosis of E. coli O157: H7 colitis: Possible association with colonic ischemia",
abstract = "Objective: E. coli O157:H7 may cause hemorrhagic colitis resembling ischemic colitis. Diagnosis is usually made by finding sorbitol-negative colonies on MacConkey agar that react with O157 and H7 antisera. Most ischemic colitis is idiopathic, but some may be caused by E. coli O157:H7, inasmuch as this organism can produce fibrin thrombi in colon vasculature. The objectives of this study were to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 infection can be diagnosed retrospectively from paraffin blocks of colon sections and whether an association exists between E. coli O157:H7 infection and colonic ischemia. Methods: Paraffin-embedded sections of normal colon (n = 2) and various colitides [ischemic (n = 11), E. coli O157:H7 (n = 2), IBD (n = 8) and pseudomembranous (n = 3)] were used. Sections were deparaffinized, rehydrated, incubated with 3{\%} peroxide in methanol, rinsed, and incubated with peroxidase-labeled antibody isolated from goats immunized with whole E. coli O157: H7. Sections were stained with peroxidase chromagen reagent and counter-stained with hematoxylin. Coarse, granular, orange-brown staining was considered positive. To determine the localization of the chromagen deposits, three cases that stained positive, including one of the culture-proved E. coli O157:H7 colitis and two of colonic ischemia, were processed for electron microscopy. Results: Both cases (100{\%}) of E. coli O157:H7 colitis and three of 11 (27.3{\%}) cases of ischemic colitis stained positive by light microscopy. In one culture-proved case, electron microscopy demonstrated staining of bacillary structures; in two cases of colonic ischemia, extensive deposits of chromagen material were present that were associated neither with inflammatory cells nor with bacterial forms. Conclusions: Immunoperoxidase staining of archival sections may be used to diagnose E. coli O157:H7 infection. An etiological role for this organism is possible in some cases of colonic ischemia.",
author = "Chinyu Su and Brandt, {Lawrence J.} and Sigal, {Samuel H.} and Elaine Alt and Steinberg, {J. J.} and Kathleen Patterson and Tarr, {Phillip I.}",
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T1 - The immunohistological diagnosis of E. coli O157

T2 - H7 colitis: Possible association with colonic ischemia

AU - Su, Chinyu

AU - Brandt, Lawrence J.

AU - Sigal, Samuel H.

AU - Alt, Elaine

AU - Steinberg, J. J.

AU - Patterson, Kathleen

AU - Tarr, Phillip I.

PY - 1998/7

Y1 - 1998/7

N2 - Objective: E. coli O157:H7 may cause hemorrhagic colitis resembling ischemic colitis. Diagnosis is usually made by finding sorbitol-negative colonies on MacConkey agar that react with O157 and H7 antisera. Most ischemic colitis is idiopathic, but some may be caused by E. coli O157:H7, inasmuch as this organism can produce fibrin thrombi in colon vasculature. The objectives of this study were to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 infection can be diagnosed retrospectively from paraffin blocks of colon sections and whether an association exists between E. coli O157:H7 infection and colonic ischemia. Methods: Paraffin-embedded sections of normal colon (n = 2) and various colitides [ischemic (n = 11), E. coli O157:H7 (n = 2), IBD (n = 8) and pseudomembranous (n = 3)] were used. Sections were deparaffinized, rehydrated, incubated with 3% peroxide in methanol, rinsed, and incubated with peroxidase-labeled antibody isolated from goats immunized with whole E. coli O157: H7. Sections were stained with peroxidase chromagen reagent and counter-stained with hematoxylin. Coarse, granular, orange-brown staining was considered positive. To determine the localization of the chromagen deposits, three cases that stained positive, including one of the culture-proved E. coli O157:H7 colitis and two of colonic ischemia, were processed for electron microscopy. Results: Both cases (100%) of E. coli O157:H7 colitis and three of 11 (27.3%) cases of ischemic colitis stained positive by light microscopy. In one culture-proved case, electron microscopy demonstrated staining of bacillary structures; in two cases of colonic ischemia, extensive deposits of chromagen material were present that were associated neither with inflammatory cells nor with bacterial forms. Conclusions: Immunoperoxidase staining of archival sections may be used to diagnose E. coli O157:H7 infection. An etiological role for this organism is possible in some cases of colonic ischemia.

AB - Objective: E. coli O157:H7 may cause hemorrhagic colitis resembling ischemic colitis. Diagnosis is usually made by finding sorbitol-negative colonies on MacConkey agar that react with O157 and H7 antisera. Most ischemic colitis is idiopathic, but some may be caused by E. coli O157:H7, inasmuch as this organism can produce fibrin thrombi in colon vasculature. The objectives of this study were to determine whether E. coli O157:H7 infection can be diagnosed retrospectively from paraffin blocks of colon sections and whether an association exists between E. coli O157:H7 infection and colonic ischemia. Methods: Paraffin-embedded sections of normal colon (n = 2) and various colitides [ischemic (n = 11), E. coli O157:H7 (n = 2), IBD (n = 8) and pseudomembranous (n = 3)] were used. Sections were deparaffinized, rehydrated, incubated with 3% peroxide in methanol, rinsed, and incubated with peroxidase-labeled antibody isolated from goats immunized with whole E. coli O157: H7. Sections were stained with peroxidase chromagen reagent and counter-stained with hematoxylin. Coarse, granular, orange-brown staining was considered positive. To determine the localization of the chromagen deposits, three cases that stained positive, including one of the culture-proved E. coli O157:H7 colitis and two of colonic ischemia, were processed for electron microscopy. Results: Both cases (100%) of E. coli O157:H7 colitis and three of 11 (27.3%) cases of ischemic colitis stained positive by light microscopy. In one culture-proved case, electron microscopy demonstrated staining of bacillary structures; in two cases of colonic ischemia, extensive deposits of chromagen material were present that were associated neither with inflammatory cells nor with bacterial forms. Conclusions: Immunoperoxidase staining of archival sections may be used to diagnose E. coli O157:H7 infection. An etiological role for this organism is possible in some cases of colonic ischemia.

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