The great escape

When cancer cells hijack the genes for chemotaxis and motility

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

245 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The combined use of the new technologies of multiphoton-based intravital imaging, the chemotaxis-mediated collection of invasive cells, and high sensitivity expression profiling has allowed the correlation of the behavior of invasive tumor cells in vivo with their gene expression patterns. New insights have resulted including a gene expression signature for invasive cells and the tumor microenvironment invasion model. This model proposes that tumor invasion and metastasis can be studied as a problem resembling normal morphogenesis. We discuss how these new insights may lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of the invasive behavior of tumor cells in vivo, which may result in new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of metastasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-718
Number of pages24
JournalAnnual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Chemotaxis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Genes
Cellular Microenvironment
Neoplasms
Tumor Microenvironment
Morphogenesis
Transcriptome
Technology
Gene Expression
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Actin
  • Arp2/3 complex
  • Capping protein
  • Cofilin
  • N-WASP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "The combined use of the new technologies of multiphoton-based intravital imaging, the chemotaxis-mediated collection of invasive cells, and high sensitivity expression profiling has allowed the correlation of the behavior of invasive tumor cells in vivo with their gene expression patterns. New insights have resulted including a gene expression signature for invasive cells and the tumor microenvironment invasion model. This model proposes that tumor invasion and metastasis can be studied as a problem resembling normal morphogenesis. We discuss how these new insights may lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of the invasive behavior of tumor cells in vivo, which may result in new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of metastasis.",
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