The good side of inflammation: Staphylococcus aureus proteins SpA and Sbi contribute to proper abscess formation and wound healing during skin and soft tissue infections

Cintia D. Gonzalez, Camila Ledo, Eliana Cela, Inés Stella, Chunliang Xu, Diego S. Ojeda, Paul S. Frenette, Marisa I. Gómez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is the most prominent cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) worldwide. Mortality associated with invasive SSTI is a major threat to public health considering the incidence of antibiotic resistant isolates in particular methicillin resistant S. aureus both in the hospital (HA-MRSA) and in the community (CA-MRSA). To overcome the increasing difficulties in the clinical management of SSTI due to MRSA, new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are urgently needed and a preventive vaccine would be welcome. The rational design of an anti-S. aureus vaccine requires a deep knowledge of the role that the different bacterial virulence factors play according to the type of infection. In the present study, using a set of isogenic deficient mutants and their complemented strains we determined that the staphylococcal surface proteins SpA and Sbi play an important role in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the skin during SSTI. SpA and Sbi initiate signaling cascades that lead to the early recruitment of neutrophils, modulate their lifespan in the skin milieu and contribute to proper abscess formation and bacterial eradication. Moreover, the expression of SpA and Sbi appear critical for skin repair and wound healing. Thus, these results indicate that SpA and Sbi can promote immune responses in the skin that are beneficial for the host and therefore, should not be neutralized with vaccine formulations designed to prevent SSTI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2657-2670
Number of pages14
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease
Volume1865
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Soft Tissue Infections
Wound Healing
Abscess
Inflammation
Skin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Vaccines
Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus Sbi protein
Neutrophil Infiltration
Virulence Factors
Chemokines
Membrane Proteins
Public Health
Cytokines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • Abscess
  • Sbi
  • Skin infections
  • SpA
  • Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

The good side of inflammation : Staphylococcus aureus proteins SpA and Sbi contribute to proper abscess formation and wound healing during skin and soft tissue infections. / Gonzalez, Cintia D.; Ledo, Camila; Cela, Eliana; Stella, Inés; Xu, Chunliang; Ojeda, Diego S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Gómez, Marisa I.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease, Vol. 1865, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 2657-2670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2415624cdce64512a8b09e4568c5c632,
title = "The good side of inflammation: Staphylococcus aureus proteins SpA and Sbi contribute to proper abscess formation and wound healing during skin and soft tissue infections",
abstract = "Staphylococcus aureus is the most prominent cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) worldwide. Mortality associated with invasive SSTI is a major threat to public health considering the incidence of antibiotic resistant isolates in particular methicillin resistant S. aureus both in the hospital (HA-MRSA) and in the community (CA-MRSA). To overcome the increasing difficulties in the clinical management of SSTI due to MRSA, new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are urgently needed and a preventive vaccine would be welcome. The rational design of an anti-S. aureus vaccine requires a deep knowledge of the role that the different bacterial virulence factors play according to the type of infection. In the present study, using a set of isogenic deficient mutants and their complemented strains we determined that the staphylococcal surface proteins SpA and Sbi play an important role in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the skin during SSTI. SpA and Sbi initiate signaling cascades that lead to the early recruitment of neutrophils, modulate their lifespan in the skin milieu and contribute to proper abscess formation and bacterial eradication. Moreover, the expression of SpA and Sbi appear critical for skin repair and wound healing. Thus, these results indicate that SpA and Sbi can promote immune responses in the skin that are beneficial for the host and therefore, should not be neutralized with vaccine formulations designed to prevent SSTI.",
keywords = "Abscess, Sbi, Skin infections, SpA, Staphylococcus aureus",
author = "Gonzalez, {Cintia D.} and Camila Ledo and Eliana Cela and In{\'e}s Stella and Chunliang Xu and Ojeda, {Diego S.} and Frenette, {Paul S.} and G{\'o}mez, {Marisa I.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbadis.2019.07.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1865",
pages = "2657--2670",
journal = "Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease",
issn = "0925-4439",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The good side of inflammation

T2 - Staphylococcus aureus proteins SpA and Sbi contribute to proper abscess formation and wound healing during skin and soft tissue infections

AU - Gonzalez, Cintia D.

AU - Ledo, Camila

AU - Cela, Eliana

AU - Stella, Inés

AU - Xu, Chunliang

AU - Ojeda, Diego S.

AU - Frenette, Paul S.

AU - Gómez, Marisa I.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Staphylococcus aureus is the most prominent cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) worldwide. Mortality associated with invasive SSTI is a major threat to public health considering the incidence of antibiotic resistant isolates in particular methicillin resistant S. aureus both in the hospital (HA-MRSA) and in the community (CA-MRSA). To overcome the increasing difficulties in the clinical management of SSTI due to MRSA, new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are urgently needed and a preventive vaccine would be welcome. The rational design of an anti-S. aureus vaccine requires a deep knowledge of the role that the different bacterial virulence factors play according to the type of infection. In the present study, using a set of isogenic deficient mutants and their complemented strains we determined that the staphylococcal surface proteins SpA and Sbi play an important role in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the skin during SSTI. SpA and Sbi initiate signaling cascades that lead to the early recruitment of neutrophils, modulate their lifespan in the skin milieu and contribute to proper abscess formation and bacterial eradication. Moreover, the expression of SpA and Sbi appear critical for skin repair and wound healing. Thus, these results indicate that SpA and Sbi can promote immune responses in the skin that are beneficial for the host and therefore, should not be neutralized with vaccine formulations designed to prevent SSTI.

AB - Staphylococcus aureus is the most prominent cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) worldwide. Mortality associated with invasive SSTI is a major threat to public health considering the incidence of antibiotic resistant isolates in particular methicillin resistant S. aureus both in the hospital (HA-MRSA) and in the community (CA-MRSA). To overcome the increasing difficulties in the clinical management of SSTI due to MRSA, new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are urgently needed and a preventive vaccine would be welcome. The rational design of an anti-S. aureus vaccine requires a deep knowledge of the role that the different bacterial virulence factors play according to the type of infection. In the present study, using a set of isogenic deficient mutants and their complemented strains we determined that the staphylococcal surface proteins SpA and Sbi play an important role in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the skin during SSTI. SpA and Sbi initiate signaling cascades that lead to the early recruitment of neutrophils, modulate their lifespan in the skin milieu and contribute to proper abscess formation and bacterial eradication. Moreover, the expression of SpA and Sbi appear critical for skin repair and wound healing. Thus, these results indicate that SpA and Sbi can promote immune responses in the skin that are beneficial for the host and therefore, should not be neutralized with vaccine formulations designed to prevent SSTI.

KW - Abscess

KW - Sbi

KW - Skin infections

KW - SpA

KW - Staphylococcus aureus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069687514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069687514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbadis.2019.07.004

DO - 10.1016/j.bbadis.2019.07.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 31299217

AN - SCOPUS:85069687514

VL - 1865

SP - 2657

EP - 2670

JO - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease

JF - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease

SN - 0925-4439

IS - 10

ER -