The frequency of GJB2 and GJB6 mutations in the New York State newborn population: Feasibility of genetic screening for hearing defects

Terry Fitzgerald, S. Duva, H. Ostrer, K. Pass, C. Oddoux, R. Ruben, M. Caggana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the US, approximately one in every 1000 children has hearing loss sufficiently severe to interfere with the acquisition of normal speech [Ann NY Acad Sci 630 (1991) 16]. The causes of non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) are known to be heterogeneous, with genetic factors accounting for 50-75% [Am J Med Genet 46 (1993) 486]. Often individuals with NSHL thought to be caused by mutations in GJB2 have only one detectable mutant allele [Am J Hum Genet 62 (1998) 792, Hum Mol Genet 6 (12) (1997) 2173]. Another gene that has been identified as a possible cause of NSHL is GJB6 that codes for the gap junction protein, connexin 30. A consecutive series of anonymous newborn dried blood specimens (n = 2089) was tested for two GJB2 mutations: (i) 35deIG, a pan-ethnic mutation; and (ii) 167delT, a mutation more frequently found in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish and Mediterranean descents. Mutation detection was validated using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization in single wells. Once the positive samples had been identified, the samples were pooled and retested. All positives in the individual experiment were correctly identified in the pooled experiment. The same random set of anonymous newborn dried blood specimens plus some additional samples were tested (n = 2112) for the 342-kb deletion in the GJB6 gene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-342
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Keywords

  • Connexin 26
  • Connexin 30
  • Deafness
  • GJB2
  • GJB6

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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