The effects of opiate use and hepatitis c virus infection on risk of diabetes mellitus in the women's interagency HIV study

Andrea A. Howard, Donald R. Hoover, Kathryn Anastos, Xi Wu, Qiuhu Shi, Howard Strickler, Stephen R. Cole, Mardge H. Cohen, Andrea Kovacs, Michael Augenbraun, Patricia S. Latham, Phyllis C. Tien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Opiate use is common in HIV-infected and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals, however, its contribution to the risk of diabetes mellitus is not well understood. METHODS: Prospective study of 1713 HIV-infected and 652 HIV-uninfected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study between October 2000 and March 2006. Diabetes defined as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, self report of diabetes medication use, or confirmed diabetes diagnosis. Opiate use determined using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Detectable plasma HCV RNA confirmed HCV infection. RESULTS: Current opiate users had a higher prevalence of diabetes (15%) than nonusers (10%, P = 0.03), and a higher risk of incident diabetes (adjusted relative hazard: 1.58, 95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 2.46), after controlling for HCV infection, HIV/antiretroviral therapy status, and diabetes risk factors including age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and body mass index. HCV infection was also an independent risk factor for diabetes (adjusted relative hazard: 1.61, 95% confidence interval: 1.02 to 2.52). HCV-infected women reporting current opiate use had the highest diabetes incidence (4.83 cases per 100 person-years). CONCLUSIONS: Among women with or at-risk for HIV, opiate use is associated with increased diabetes risk independently of HCV infection. Diabetic screening should be part of care for opiate users and those infected with HCV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-159
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Fingerprint

Opiate Alkaloids
Hepatitis Viruses
Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Diabetes Mellitus
HIV
Confidence Intervals
Self Report
Fasting
Body Mass Index
Prospective Studies
RNA
Interviews

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Fasting glucose
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • HIV
  • Opiate use
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

The effects of opiate use and hepatitis c virus infection on risk of diabetes mellitus in the women's interagency HIV study. / Howard, Andrea A.; Hoover, Donald R.; Anastos, Kathryn; Wu, Xi; Shi, Qiuhu; Strickler, Howard; Cole, Stephen R.; Cohen, Mardge H.; Kovacs, Andrea; Augenbraun, Michael; Latham, Patricia S.; Tien, Phyllis C.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.06.2010, p. 152-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howard, Andrea A. ; Hoover, Donald R. ; Anastos, Kathryn ; Wu, Xi ; Shi, Qiuhu ; Strickler, Howard ; Cole, Stephen R. ; Cohen, Mardge H. ; Kovacs, Andrea ; Augenbraun, Michael ; Latham, Patricia S. ; Tien, Phyllis C. / The effects of opiate use and hepatitis c virus infection on risk of diabetes mellitus in the women's interagency HIV study. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2010 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 152-159.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Opiate use is common in HIV-infected and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals, however, its contribution to the risk of diabetes mellitus is not well understood. METHODS: Prospective study of 1713 HIV-infected and 652 HIV-uninfected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study between October 2000 and March 2006. Diabetes defined as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, self report of diabetes medication use, or confirmed diabetes diagnosis. Opiate use determined using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Detectable plasma HCV RNA confirmed HCV infection. RESULTS: Current opiate users had a higher prevalence of diabetes (15{\%}) than nonusers (10{\%}, P = 0.03), and a higher risk of incident diabetes (adjusted relative hazard: 1.58, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.01 to 2.46), after controlling for HCV infection, HIV/antiretroviral therapy status, and diabetes risk factors including age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and body mass index. HCV infection was also an independent risk factor for diabetes (adjusted relative hazard: 1.61, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.02 to 2.52). HCV-infected women reporting current opiate use had the highest diabetes incidence (4.83 cases per 100 person-years). CONCLUSIONS: Among women with or at-risk for HIV, opiate use is associated with increased diabetes risk independently of HCV infection. Diabetic screening should be part of care for opiate users and those infected with HCV.",
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AU - Hoover, Donald R.

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AU - Wu, Xi

AU - Shi, Qiuhu

AU - Strickler, Howard

AU - Cole, Stephen R.

AU - Cohen, Mardge H.

AU - Kovacs, Andrea

AU - Augenbraun, Michael

AU - Latham, Patricia S.

AU - Tien, Phyllis C.

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