The effect of smoking status on survival following radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer

Jana L. Fox, Kenneth E. Rosenzweig, Jamie S. Ostroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dangers of cigarette smoking are numerous and well-known, including the causal relationship to lung cancer. This study investigates the effect that smoking status at initial consultation has on radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We identified 237 patients treated between 1991 and 2001 with definitive radiation or chemoradiation who had complete smoking histories. Median age was 73, with 56% males. Distribution by stage was as follows: I/II - 27%, IIIA - 27%, IIIB - 45%, recurrent - 1%. Two-year overall survival, stratified by stage of disease, was calculated from the time of initiation of treatment. Median follow-up time from the end of treatment was 13 months. Among those with stage I/II disease, current smokers had a 2-year survival rate of 41% and a median survival of 13.7 months while non-smokers had a 2-year survival of 56% and a median survival of 27.9 months (P=0.01). Patients with stage III disease did not show any significant differences in overall survival. There were no significant differences in cancer-specific survival in either stage. In conclusion, among NSCLC patients diagnosed with early stage disease, current smokers have a poorer prognosis for survival after radiation therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalLung Cancer
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Radiotherapy
Smoking
Survival
Lung Neoplasms
Referral and Consultation
Survival Rate
Radiation
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Radiation therapy
  • Radiotherapy
  • Smoking
  • Survival
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

The effect of smoking status on survival following radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer. / Fox, Jana L.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Ostroff, Jamie S.

In: Lung Cancer, Vol. 44, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 287-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, Jana L. ; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. ; Ostroff, Jamie S. / The effect of smoking status on survival following radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer. In: Lung Cancer. 2004 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 287-293.
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