The effect of platelet-rich plasma on female androgenetic alopecia: A randomized controlled trial

Danielle P. Dubin, Matthew J. Lin, Hayley M. Leight, Aaron S. Farberg, Richard L. Torbeck, William B. Burton, Hooman Khorasani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may be a useful treatment for androgenetic alopecia (AGA), although objective studies are needed. Objective: To determine whether PRP injections improve female AGA. Method: Prospective randomized controlled trial of 30 women diagnosed with AGA. Patients received subdermal scalp injections of Eclipse system PRP or placebo saline at weeks 0, 4, and 8. Outcome measures were changes in hair density (hair/cm2), hair caliber (mm), and blinded global photographic assessment (improved or not improved) at week 24. Results: Blinded global photographic assessment indicated that 57% of patients receiving PRP versus 7% of patients receiving saline improved at week 24 from baseline (P <.01). Compared to baseline, there was improvement in mean density in the PRP group versus the placebo group at week 8 (+71.1 vs −26.7 hairs/cm2; P <.01) and week 24 (+105.9 vs −52.4 hairs/cm2; P <.01). Compared to baseline, there was improvement in mean caliber in the PRP group versus the placebo group at week 8 (+0.0043 vs −0.0034 mm; P <.01) and week 24 (+0.0053 vs −0.0060 mm; P <.01). Adverse effects included headache, scalp tightness, swelling, redness, and postinjection bleeding. Limitations: Two patients lost to follow-up. Conclusions: PRP with the Eclipse system is a safe and effective intervention for female AGA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • androgenetic alopecia
  • female pattern hair loss
  • platelet-rich plasma
  • regenerative medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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