The DIET study: Long-term outcomes of a cognitive-behavioral weight- control intervention in independent-living elders

Ellen A. Dornelas, Judith Wylie-Rosett, Charles Swencionis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the long-term outcomes of a cognitive-behavioral weight-control intervention implemented in a community-based sample of independent-living, older adults. Design: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare an intervention community with a wait-listed control community. Comparisons between the communities were made at 40 weeks (J Am Diet Assoc. 1994;94:37-42). The controlled trial ended at 40 weeks; then both communities received 2 years of intervention. Two-year data from both communities were combined and are presented in this article. Three-year outcome data from the initial intervention community were available and are also presented. Subjects: A total of 247 overweight (>4.5 kg of age-adjusted weight), older (mean age=71 years) adults in 2 independent-living retirement communities participated in the study. Intervention: The Dietary Intervention: Evaluation of Technology (DIET) study consisted of an intensive 10-week psychoeducational approach focused on lifestyle change, followed by a less intensive 2-year phase focusing on relapse prevention and maintenance of lifestyle changes. Outcome measures: Physiologic and behavioral variables were analyzed at baseline and at 2 years after baseline. This article reports the combined 2-year outcome data from both retirement communities. Results of an additional follow-up 1 year after intervention was withdrawn are reported for the initial intervention community. Statistical analysis: A within- subjects repeated measures analysis of variance design was used to test for significant changes in weight and lipid values over time. Results: At 2 years, 70% of those who started the intervention remained actively enrolled. This group showed significant decreases in body mass index (-1.2, P<.001) and glucose level (-0.80 mmol/L, P<.001). Although high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels had increased at 40 weeks after baseline, this was not maintained at 2 years. At the 3-year follow-up, changes in body mass index and glucose level were maintained. Applications/conclusions: The purpose of this article was to describe the long-term outcomes of a community-based weight-reduction intervention for older adults. The findings may be of interest to clinicians who design community or worksite weight- reduction programs. Although the intervention was designed to be a low- intensity program, attrition over the length of the study indicates that this intervention was efficacious in maintaining reductions in weight and glucose levels for overweight older adults for 3 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1276-1281
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume98
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1998

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Independent Living
retirement communities
weight control
Technology
Weights and Measures
glucose
lifestyle
body mass index
weight loss
weight control programs
relapse
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
statistical analysis
analysis of variance
experimental design
Retirement
lipids
Glucose
diet
Life Style

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The DIET study : Long-term outcomes of a cognitive-behavioral weight- control intervention in independent-living elders. / Dornelas, Ellen A.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Swencionis, Charles.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 98, No. 11, 11.1998, p. 1276-1281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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