The development of auditory attention in children.

H. Gomes, Sophie Molholm, C. Christodoulou, W. Ritter, N. Cowan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we review the development of four components of auditory attention: arousal, orienting, selective attention and sustained attention. We focus especially on the processes responsible for the selection of specific stimuli for further processing because these are essential for learning and development. Although much work still needs to be done, there is evidence of developmental change in some of the components of attention, especially early in infancy. Later developmental improvements seem to be primarily attributable to higher cognitive processes, such as motivation, strategy development and implementation, and voluntary direction and regulation of attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers in Bioscience
Volume5
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Processing
Arousal
Motivation
Direction compound
Learning

Cite this

Gomes, H., Molholm, S., Christodoulou, C., Ritter, W., & Cowan, N. (2000). The development of auditory attention in children. Frontiers in Bioscience, 5.

The development of auditory attention in children. / Gomes, H.; Molholm, Sophie; Christodoulou, C.; Ritter, W.; Cowan, N.

In: Frontiers in Bioscience, Vol. 5, 2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gomes, H, Molholm, S, Christodoulou, C, Ritter, W & Cowan, N 2000, 'The development of auditory attention in children.', Frontiers in Bioscience, vol. 5.
Gomes, H. ; Molholm, Sophie ; Christodoulou, C. ; Ritter, W. ; Cowan, N. / The development of auditory attention in children. In: Frontiers in Bioscience. 2000 ; Vol. 5.
@article{420158b4fe4f45a5a7504ae94c53ccd6,
title = "The development of auditory attention in children.",
abstract = "In this paper we review the development of four components of auditory attention: arousal, orienting, selective attention and sustained attention. We focus especially on the processes responsible for the selection of specific stimuli for further processing because these are essential for learning and development. Although much work still needs to be done, there is evidence of developmental change in some of the components of attention, especially early in infancy. Later developmental improvements seem to be primarily attributable to higher cognitive processes, such as motivation, strategy development and implementation, and voluntary direction and regulation of attention.",
author = "H. Gomes and Sophie Molholm and C. Christodoulou and W. Ritter and N. Cowan",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
journal = "Frontiers in Bioscience - Landmark",
issn = "1093-9946",
publisher = "Frontiers in Bioscience",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The development of auditory attention in children.

AU - Gomes, H.

AU - Molholm, Sophie

AU - Christodoulou, C.

AU - Ritter, W.

AU - Cowan, N.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - In this paper we review the development of four components of auditory attention: arousal, orienting, selective attention and sustained attention. We focus especially on the processes responsible for the selection of specific stimuli for further processing because these are essential for learning and development. Although much work still needs to be done, there is evidence of developmental change in some of the components of attention, especially early in infancy. Later developmental improvements seem to be primarily attributable to higher cognitive processes, such as motivation, strategy development and implementation, and voluntary direction and regulation of attention.

AB - In this paper we review the development of four components of auditory attention: arousal, orienting, selective attention and sustained attention. We focus especially on the processes responsible for the selection of specific stimuli for further processing because these are essential for learning and development. Although much work still needs to be done, there is evidence of developmental change in some of the components of attention, especially early in infancy. Later developmental improvements seem to be primarily attributable to higher cognitive processes, such as motivation, strategy development and implementation, and voluntary direction and regulation of attention.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033631663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033631663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - Frontiers in Bioscience - Landmark

JF - Frontiers in Bioscience - Landmark

SN - 1093-9946

ER -