The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs

Nathaniel H. Robin, V. Reid Sutton, John Caldwell, James Jackson, Mira Irons, Laurie Demmer, Peter Byers, Jay Ellison, Gerald Feldman, Sue Gross, Susan D. Klugman, Margo Adam, Kim Keppler-Noreuil, Rob Hopkin, Shawn McCandless, Daniel Sharer, Georgia Wiesner, Reed Pyeritz, Judith Westerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In-service exams are a commonly used educational tool in postgraduate medical education. Although most specialties utilize such an exam, medical genetics did not. It was decided in the spring of 2009 at the inaugural Medical Genetics Residency Program Directors (PDs) Group meeting to develop and implement such a test. Methods: Using questions sent in from PDs, a 125-question exam was created, with 125 multiple-choice questions according to the format of the National Board of Medical Examiners. The exam covered genetics in the following areas: basic/molecular (∼45 questions), cancer and adult (20), prenatal (20), biochemical (20), pediatric/dysmorphology (20). The exam was administered for the first time in February 2010, and again with modifications in 2011. Results: In total, 174 trainees from 35 programs completed the exam in 2010; in 2011 the number increased to 214, representing 39 US programs, and 4 Canadian programs. For both years, most participants were medical genetics residents (106 in 2010; 127 in 2011), but a substantial number of clinical laboratory fellows also participated (68 in 2010; 85 in 2011). Conclusion: The development and implementation of this test were an overall success, in that in two years we were able to secure almost 100% participation from medical genetics residency programs, and that we created an infrastructure to develop and implement this exam on a yearly basis. There is need for improvement, notably in the relatively low mean score and relatively narrow spread of scores. However, we believe that, with efforts under way to improve the quality of the questions, the in-service exam will become a fundamental tool in medical genetics residency education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-557
Number of pages6
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Genetics
Internship and Residency
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Group Processes
Medical Education
Pediatrics
Education
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • in-service exam
  • medical genetics residency education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Robin, N. H., Reid Sutton, V., Caldwell, J., Jackson, J., Irons, M., Demmer, L., ... Westerman, J. (2012). The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs. Genetics in Medicine, 14(5), 552-557. https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2011.41

The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs. / Robin, Nathaniel H.; Reid Sutton, V.; Caldwell, John; Jackson, James; Irons, Mira; Demmer, Laurie; Byers, Peter; Ellison, Jay; Feldman, Gerald; Gross, Sue; Klugman, Susan D.; Adam, Margo; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Hopkin, Rob; McCandless, Shawn; Sharer, Daniel; Wiesner, Georgia; Pyeritz, Reed; Westerman, Judith.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 552-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robin, NH, Reid Sutton, V, Caldwell, J, Jackson, J, Irons, M, Demmer, L, Byers, P, Ellison, J, Feldman, G, Gross, S, Klugman, SD, Adam, M, Keppler-Noreuil, K, Hopkin, R, McCandless, S, Sharer, D, Wiesner, G, Pyeritz, R & Westerman, J 2012, 'The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs', Genetics in Medicine, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 552-557. https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2011.41
Robin NH, Reid Sutton V, Caldwell J, Jackson J, Irons M, Demmer L et al. The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs. Genetics in Medicine. 2012 May;14(5):552-557. https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2011.41
Robin, Nathaniel H. ; Reid Sutton, V. ; Caldwell, John ; Jackson, James ; Irons, Mira ; Demmer, Laurie ; Byers, Peter ; Ellison, Jay ; Feldman, Gerald ; Gross, Sue ; Klugman, Susan D. ; Adam, Margo ; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim ; Hopkin, Rob ; McCandless, Shawn ; Sharer, Daniel ; Wiesner, Georgia ; Pyeritz, Reed ; Westerman, Judith. / The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 552-557.
@article{ffc569ffe20f4f3ea7aabae27f0c0ff3,
title = "The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs",
abstract = "Purpose: In-service exams are a commonly used educational tool in postgraduate medical education. Although most specialties utilize such an exam, medical genetics did not. It was decided in the spring of 2009 at the inaugural Medical Genetics Residency Program Directors (PDs) Group meeting to develop and implement such a test. Methods: Using questions sent in from PDs, a 125-question exam was created, with 125 multiple-choice questions according to the format of the National Board of Medical Examiners. The exam covered genetics in the following areas: basic/molecular (∼45 questions), cancer and adult (20), prenatal (20), biochemical (20), pediatric/dysmorphology (20). The exam was administered for the first time in February 2010, and again with modifications in 2011. Results: In total, 174 trainees from 35 programs completed the exam in 2010; in 2011 the number increased to 214, representing 39 US programs, and 4 Canadian programs. For both years, most participants were medical genetics residents (106 in 2010; 127 in 2011), but a substantial number of clinical laboratory fellows also participated (68 in 2010; 85 in 2011). Conclusion: The development and implementation of this test were an overall success, in that in two years we were able to secure almost 100{\%} participation from medical genetics residency programs, and that we created an infrastructure to develop and implement this exam on a yearly basis. There is need for improvement, notably in the relatively low mean score and relatively narrow spread of scores. However, we believe that, with efforts under way to improve the quality of the questions, the in-service exam will become a fundamental tool in medical genetics residency education.",
keywords = "in-service exam, medical genetics residency education",
author = "Robin, {Nathaniel H.} and {Reid Sutton}, V. and John Caldwell and James Jackson and Mira Irons and Laurie Demmer and Peter Byers and Jay Ellison and Gerald Feldman and Sue Gross and Klugman, {Susan D.} and Margo Adam and Kim Keppler-Noreuil and Rob Hopkin and Shawn McCandless and Daniel Sharer and Georgia Wiesner and Reed Pyeritz and Judith Westerman",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1038/gim.2011.41",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "552--557",
journal = "Genetics in Medicine",
issn = "1098-3600",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The development and implementation of an in-service exam for medical genetics residency programs

AU - Robin, Nathaniel H.

AU - Reid Sutton, V.

AU - Caldwell, John

AU - Jackson, James

AU - Irons, Mira

AU - Demmer, Laurie

AU - Byers, Peter

AU - Ellison, Jay

AU - Feldman, Gerald

AU - Gross, Sue

AU - Klugman, Susan D.

AU - Adam, Margo

AU - Keppler-Noreuil, Kim

AU - Hopkin, Rob

AU - McCandless, Shawn

AU - Sharer, Daniel

AU - Wiesner, Georgia

AU - Pyeritz, Reed

AU - Westerman, Judith

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Purpose: In-service exams are a commonly used educational tool in postgraduate medical education. Although most specialties utilize such an exam, medical genetics did not. It was decided in the spring of 2009 at the inaugural Medical Genetics Residency Program Directors (PDs) Group meeting to develop and implement such a test. Methods: Using questions sent in from PDs, a 125-question exam was created, with 125 multiple-choice questions according to the format of the National Board of Medical Examiners. The exam covered genetics in the following areas: basic/molecular (∼45 questions), cancer and adult (20), prenatal (20), biochemical (20), pediatric/dysmorphology (20). The exam was administered for the first time in February 2010, and again with modifications in 2011. Results: In total, 174 trainees from 35 programs completed the exam in 2010; in 2011 the number increased to 214, representing 39 US programs, and 4 Canadian programs. For both years, most participants were medical genetics residents (106 in 2010; 127 in 2011), but a substantial number of clinical laboratory fellows also participated (68 in 2010; 85 in 2011). Conclusion: The development and implementation of this test were an overall success, in that in two years we were able to secure almost 100% participation from medical genetics residency programs, and that we created an infrastructure to develop and implement this exam on a yearly basis. There is need for improvement, notably in the relatively low mean score and relatively narrow spread of scores. However, we believe that, with efforts under way to improve the quality of the questions, the in-service exam will become a fundamental tool in medical genetics residency education.

AB - Purpose: In-service exams are a commonly used educational tool in postgraduate medical education. Although most specialties utilize such an exam, medical genetics did not. It was decided in the spring of 2009 at the inaugural Medical Genetics Residency Program Directors (PDs) Group meeting to develop and implement such a test. Methods: Using questions sent in from PDs, a 125-question exam was created, with 125 multiple-choice questions according to the format of the National Board of Medical Examiners. The exam covered genetics in the following areas: basic/molecular (∼45 questions), cancer and adult (20), prenatal (20), biochemical (20), pediatric/dysmorphology (20). The exam was administered for the first time in February 2010, and again with modifications in 2011. Results: In total, 174 trainees from 35 programs completed the exam in 2010; in 2011 the number increased to 214, representing 39 US programs, and 4 Canadian programs. For both years, most participants were medical genetics residents (106 in 2010; 127 in 2011), but a substantial number of clinical laboratory fellows also participated (68 in 2010; 85 in 2011). Conclusion: The development and implementation of this test were an overall success, in that in two years we were able to secure almost 100% participation from medical genetics residency programs, and that we created an infrastructure to develop and implement this exam on a yearly basis. There is need for improvement, notably in the relatively low mean score and relatively narrow spread of scores. However, we believe that, with efforts under way to improve the quality of the questions, the in-service exam will become a fundamental tool in medical genetics residency education.

KW - in-service exam

KW - medical genetics residency education

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861916291&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861916291&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/gim.2011.41

DO - 10.1038/gim.2011.41

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 552

EP - 557

JO - Genetics in Medicine

JF - Genetics in Medicine

SN - 1098-3600

IS - 5

ER -