The current state of screening and decolonization for the prevention of staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection after total hip and knee arthroplasty

Mitchell C. Weiser, Calin S. Moucha

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillinsensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized withMSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1449-1458
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume97
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Surgical Wound Infection
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Staphylococcus aureus
Hip
Staphylococcal Infections
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Coagulase
Staphylococcus
Nose
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "The current state of screening and decolonization for the prevention of staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection after total hip and knee arthroplasty",
abstract = "The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillinsensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized withMSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty.",
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